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Funeral protesters ordered to pay


Margie M. Phelps, left, demonstrates with her husband, Fred Phelps, and her daughter Margie J. Phelps  on Wednesday outside the federal courthouse in Baltimore. Associated Press
 (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Margie M. Phelps, left, demonstrates with her husband, Fred Phelps, and her daughter Margie J. Phelps on Wednesday outside the federal courthouse in Baltimore. Associated Press (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)

BALTIMORE – A grieving father won a nearly $11 million verdict Wednesday against a fundamentalist Kansas church that pickets military funerals out of a belief that the war in Iraq is a punishment for the nation’s tolerance of homosexuality.

Albert Snyder, of York, Pa., sued the Westboro Baptist Church for unspecified damages after members demonstrated at the March 2006 funeral of his son, Marine Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder, who was killed in Iraq.

The federal jury first awarded $2.9 million in compensatory damages. It returned in the afternoon with its decision to award $6 million in punitive damages for invasion of privacy and $2 million for causing emotional distress.

Snyder’s attorney, Craig Trebilcock, had urged jurors to determine an amount “that says don’t do this in Maryland again. Do not bring your circus of hate to Maryland again.”

The defense said it planned to appeal, and one of the church’s leaders, Shirley Phelps-Roper, said the members would continue to picket military funerals.

“Absolutely; don’t you understand this was an act in futility?” Phelps-Roper said.

Church members routinely picket funerals of military personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, carrying signs such as “Thank God for dead soldiers.”

Snyder claimed the protests intruded upon what should have been a private ceremony and sullied his memory of the event.

The church members testified they are following their religious beliefs by spreading the message that soldiers are dying because the nation is too tolerant of homosexuality.

Their attorneys maintained in closing arguments Tuesday that the burial was a public event and that even abhorrent points of view are protected by the First Amendment, which guarantees freedom of speech and religion.

A number of states have passed laws regarding funeral protests, and Congress has passed a law prohibiting such protests at federal cemeteries. But the Maryland lawsuit is believed to be the first filed by the family of a fallen serviceman.

The church and three of its leaders – Fred Phelps and his daughters Phelps-Roper and Rebekah Phelps-Davis, 46 – were found liable for invasion of privacy and intent to inflict emotional distress.


 

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