Arrow-right Camera
News >  Features

NCAA tourney features historic match-ups

Tonight’s must-see

Basketball, 3 p.m., CBS.

There were upsets along the way, especially by a dazzling Davidson team. When the early rounds were finished, however, the Cinderella teams were gone: For the first time in the NCAA tourney’s history, the four top-seeded teams had survived. Memphis and UCLA play first, with tip-off at about 3:07 p.m. Then Kansas and North Carolina play, 40 minutes after the first game ends; winners collide Monday.

Tonight’s might-see

“The Night James Brown Saved Boston,” 9 p.m., VH1. In the aftermath of the Martin Luther King assassination, riots spread. Officials considered canceling a James Brown concert at the Boston Garden.

Then came a better idea: Call the show a tribute and televise it. That story is told here, with sharp commentary about the times. The music clips are brief, but they remind us what a brilliant performer Brown was.

Other choices include

“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001), 8-11 p.m., ABC. Here’s the start of the Harry saga. The opening minutes are wonderfully fresh; the rest is fairly good.

“Law & Order: Criminal Intent,” 8 p.m., NBC. In a rerun, a guy went to bed with two women; when he woke up, the blonde was dead, the brunette was gone and he was a suspect.

“The Godfather” (1972, A&E) and “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” (1971, ABC Family); 8 p.m. Here are two terrific films – one for grown-ups, the other for any age.

“Must Love Dogs” (2005, Oxygen) and “Under the Tuscan Sun” (2003), WE, 8 p.m. Diane Lane’s subtle skill saves both films. One is a romance with John Cusack; the other has her buying a villa.

“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” 9 p.m., NBC. This rerun visits the world of ultimate fighting.

“Law & Order,” 10 p.m., NBC. A psychiatrist is killed in this rerun. Suspects include his patients and his young wife.

“Saturday Night Live,” 11:29 p.m., NBC. Christopher Walken hosts, with music by Panic at the Disco.

Sunday’s must-see

“Wire in the Blood” season-opener, 8 p.m., BBC America.

A British police psychiatrist heads to Texas, where a former patient faces murder charges.

Yes, this is a British movie, set entirely in Texas. There’s culture-clash humor, plus lots of fierce drama. Robson Green, a PBS favorite via “Touching Evil,” is subtly perfect. The story gets melodramatic, but it all makes sense.

Sunday’s might-see

“Monk,” 8 p.m., NBC.

Having exhausted other choices during the writers’ strike, NBC wisely borrows this show (and “Psych,” which follows at 9 p.m.) from the USA Network.

Tony Shalhoub is terrific as Adrian Monk, a detective who fears almost everything. He’s tickled tonight to have a new friend (Andy Richter). This isn’t one of the better episodes, but it’s a fun option.

Other choices include

“Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (2005), 7 and 9:30 p.m., ABC Family. Director Tim Burton and Johnny Depp brilliantly redo a family classic.

PBS’ “Nature: What Females Want and Males Will Do,” 7 p.m. KSPS Channel 7, 8 p.m. KDCT Channel 26. So you think human males will do a lot for sex? Consider other species. The males change colors, dance, sing; they even create drums. This is a fun film, concluding next week.

“Cold Case,” 9 p.m., CBS. The popular drama has its first new, post-strike episode. Lily and Valens go to West Virginia to retrieve a murder suspect.

PBS’ “Masterpiece Theatre: Sense and Sensibility,” 8 p.m. KSPS Channel 7, 9 p.m. KCDT Channel 26. As the first half of this tale ended, romances foundered. Now the ending, cleverly adapted by Andrew Davies, patches things together. It’s a fine finish to PBS’ Jane Austen project.

“King,” 8-10 p.m., History Channel. Tom Brokaw brings rich depth to this portrait of Martin Luther King. We see a deeply intellectual man who also had the common touch.

“John Adams,” 9 p.m., HBO. No one ever said the vice presidency would be exciting. Here’s a dry, somber hour.

“The Tudors,” 9:04 p.m., Showtime. In a strong episode, King Henry VIII reaches a pivotal time in his passionate relationship with Anne Boleyn.

 

Subscribe to the Morning Review newsletter

Get the day’s top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning by subscribing to our newsletter

There was a problem subscribing you to the newsletter. Double check your email and try again, or email webteam@spokesman.com

You have been successfully subscribed!