January 19, 2008 in Nation/World

Land reverting to Native Hawaiians

Associated Press The Spokesman-Review
 

HONOLULU – More than 200 acres of land that belonged to the Kingdom of Hawaii before the United States took control a century ago will be returned to Native Hawaiians, according to terms of a $200 million tentative settlement announced Friday.

The agreement, which still has to be approved by the Legislature, is intended to end a long-running dispute over ceded lands.

The land to be turned over includes about 80 acres of the Big Island resort area on Banyon Drive in Hilo, which is currently occupied by several hotels and a golf course.

Under the deal, three commercial and industrial properties on Oahu and the Big Island worth $187 million would be transferred to the state agency created to look out for Native Hawaiians.

Properties at the center of the argument are referred to as “ceded lands” that the U.S. government took control of from the Republic of Hawaii five years after the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom. Parts of the land dispute were settled in 1993.


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