May 5, 2008 in Opinion

In their words

The Spokesman-Review
 

“Before the State can commit a person for what may arguably the remainder of his life, the State must be put through the inconvenience of fully complying with the statute.”

– Washington state Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders, author of the 5-4 majority opinion that overturned a defendant’s conviction as a violent sexual predator because the commitment request was filed by a prosecutor from the wrong county.

“These seizures are just a reminder that this stuff is coming to your neighborhood.”

– Special Agent Steve Robertson of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, talking about a series of confiscations that netted millions of dollars worth of methamphetamine bound from Mexico to various U.S. destinations.

“My wife calls me the bread loser. But it’s extreme bread-losing now, because we can’t fly.”

– North Idaho pilot and businessman Roger Dunham, who is having trouble finding fuel for his aircraft, which is allowed to burn automobile gasoline but can’t if it’s blended with increasingly popular ethanol.

“I would not want to be the Chisms right now.”

– Washington State Patrol Capt. Jeff DeVere, commenting on the adversity faced by the family of Spokane firefighter Todd Chism, whom WSP investigators arrested on charges of buying child pornography that turned out to be the apparent result of identity theft.

“There is the inherent risk of a hole in the floor. And you have the risk of firefighters landing on each other.”

– Spokeswoman Elaine Fischer, of the Washington state Department of Labor and Industries, explaining a safety consideration that is one of the reasons fire stations in this state are no longer being designed with the brass poles that once were standard.

“It’s our job to prepare for the worst, and the track record of the last few years sets us up to be busy.”

– Fire management officer Chris Simonson, of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, anticipating a busy forest fire season in Idaho where heavy spring runoff is expected to nourish the undergrowth that becomes fuel later on.

“They are amazing predators. They will eat anything and continuously. They don’t have an on-off switch.”

– Canadian fisheries official Ken Cooke, explaining why the migration of Humboldt giant squid into northern Pacific waters in recent years is seen as a threat to Washington’s and Oregon’s coastal fisheries.


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