November 16, 2008 in Nation/World

Diocese splits from Episcopal Church

 

The theologically conservative Diocese of Fort Worth voted Saturday to split from the liberal-leaning Episcopal Church, the fourth traditional diocese to do so in a long-running debate over the Bible, gay relationships and other issues.

About 80 percent of clergy and parishioners in the Texas diocese supported the break in a series of votes at a diocesan convention.

The Steering Committee North Texas Episcopalians, an umbrella group for those who want to stay with the denomination, plans to reorganize the diocese. They promised that “the Episcopal Church’s work of Christian ministry and evangelization will go forward” in the region.

A lengthy, expensive legal battle is expected over who owns Episcopal property and funds. The Fort Worth diocese oversees more than 50 parishes and missions serving about 19,000 people. The Steering Committee estimates that at least five parishes and hundreds of other churchgoers will remain with the New York-based national church.

Santa Clara, Calif.

Engineer arrested after shootings

A 47-year-old engineer arrested on suspicion of fatally shooting three of his co-workers had been laid off hours earlier and returned to the office to ask for a meeting with the victims, police said Saturday.

Jing Hua Wu was arrested Saturday, a day after the shootings at an office complex in Santa Clara, west of San Jose. A manhunt ended at an intersection in his home city of Mountain View, and he will be booked into jail on three counts of murder, said Santa Clara police Lt. Mike Sellers.

Wu had worked at the Silicon Valley high-tech firm SiPort Inc. as a product test engineer until he was let go on Friday morning. Police said he returned sometime after 3 p.m. Friday.

“He requested a meeting with several company officials,” said Santa Clara Police Chief Stephen Lodge. “It was during this meeting that Jing Wu took out a 9 mm handgun and shot and killed all three officials.”

New York

Times Square gets eco-friendly

This winter, New Year’s Eve revelers will have a close-up view of Times Square’s first environmentally friendly billboard.

But the billboard might not be quite as dazzling as some of its high-powered neighbors along the Great White Way.

Construction on the 35,000-pound sign advertising Ricoh Americas Corp. is to begin this month across the avenue from the building where the ball drops on New Year’s Eve.

Powered by 16 wind turbines and 64 solar panels, the sign is expected to save $12,000 to $15,000 per month in electricity costs.

From wire reports


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