Nation/World

Hudson’s nephew was shot to death

The 7-year-old nephew of Oscar-winning actress Jennifer Hudson died of multiple gunshot wounds, Chicago authorities said Tuesday.

Cook County spokesman Sean Howard told the Associated Press that in Tuesday’s autopsy the county’s medical examiner ruled Julian King’s death a homicide. Howard declined to say where the child suffered wounds or how long he had been dead, citing an ongoing Chicago police investigation.

King’s body was found Monday in a white SUV, three days after the bodies of Hudson’s mother and brother were discovered in their home on the city’s South Side.

No one has been charged in the deaths, but William Balfour, the boy’s stepfather and the estranged husband of Hudson’s sister, has been named as a suspect.

Boston

Charges possible in Uzi accident

A prosecutor said Tuesday he is investigating whether criminal charges should be filed after an 8-year-old boy accidentally killed himself while firing an Uzi submachine gun at a gun fair in western Massachusetts.

Christopher Bizilj, of Ashford, Conn., shot himself in the head when he lost control of the 9mm micro submachine gun as it recoiled while he was firing at a pumpkin. Police have said the shooting at the Machine Gun Shoot and Firearms Expo at the Westfield Sportsman’s Club on Sunday was an accident.

Hampden County District Attorney William Bennett said he is investigating whether the gun fair violated the state’s firearms law by allowing the boy to fire the machine gun, and also whether it was “a reckless or wanton act to allow an 8-year-old to use a fully loaded automatic weapon.”

“At this point in the investigation I have found no lawful authority which allows an 8-year-old to possess or fire a machine gun,” Bennett said in a statement.

The boy was attending the gun fair with his father and brother Colin, a sixth-grader. His father, Charles Bizilj, said Christopher had experience firing handguns and rifles, but Sunday was his first time firing an automatic weapon. A certified instructor was with the boy at the time.

From wire reports


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