Nation/World


Leader says hatred of U.S. runs deep

THURSDAY, OCT. 30, 2008

Iran’s supreme leader said Wednesday that his country’s hatred for the United States runs deep and differences between the two nations go beyond a “few political issues.”

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei’s comments on state-run television less than a week before the American presidential elections were seen as a signal that a thaw in U.S.-Iran relations was not expected no matter who wins the Nov. 4 race.

Khamenei said the hatred is rooted in 50 years of U.S. intervention in Iran’s domestic affairs and hostility toward Tehran.

“The hatred of the Iranian nation is deep-seated. The reason is the various conspiracies by the U.S. government against the Iranian people and government in the past 50 years,” Khamenei said.

He was addressing a group of students in Tehran days ahead of the 29th anniversary of the 1979 storming of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran by militant students. Iran blames the CIA for helping topple the elected government of Mohammad Mosaddeq in the 1950s and blames the United States for openly supporting the late Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi against the 1979 Islamic revolution.

Bonn, Germany

Chess champ keeps his title

Viswanathan Anand of India retained his world chess title Wednesday by drawing with the white pieces against Russian challenger Vladimir Kramnik.

The 24-move draw gave Anand a 6.5-4.5 victory in the best-of-12 game match, one of the shortest championship matches in history.

Down two points, Kramnik needed to win with Black, a nearly impossible task at this level. Instead he had to concede a draw after a short but tough fight.

After the game, Anand said he was “more relieved than happy.” He dominated the first half of the match, winning three games and drawing the other three.

The 12-game match format makes it difficult for a player to overcome an early deficit. From 1951 to 1972 – when Bobby Fischer defeated Boris Spassky – matches were normally 24 games.

From wire reports

 

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