Sports

Fast Break: WIAA adopts 35-second clock for boys

Prep basketball

WIAA adopts 35-second clock for boys

The clock will be ticking in Washington boys basketball next winter – for 35 seconds.

In a surprise development, the Representative Assembly of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association has overwhelmingly approved the introduction of a shot clock for boys – becoming the seventh state to adopt such legislation.

“It will be interesting,” North Central coach Jay Webber said. “I guess I’m glad it’s 35 seconds and not less than that.”

Last fall, a survey revealed that 66 percent of the state’s high school coaches favored a shot clock, but the state coaches association voted narrowly to recommend against its implementation. But the WIAA vote Friday was a slam dunk – 42-11 in favor of the measure.

“The more I started talking to more basketball coaches, I thought it wasn’t going to pass,” WIAA executive director Mike Colbrese told the Seattle Times, “but then maybe a week ago I thought, ‘It’s got a chance.’ ”

Washington is already one of eight states to use a shot clock in girls basketball, a 30-second clock that was introduced in 1974.

College football

They take it seriously there

A national spring game record crowd of 95,722 came out to enjoy the high temperatures and watch Terrelle Pryor throw two long touchdown passes in 30 seconds, leading the Gray over the Scarlet 23-3 on Saturday at Ohio Stadium in Columbus.

The attendance topped the 92,138 Alabama drew for Nick Saban’s coaching debut in 2007.

Ohio State fans paid $5 per ticket, with the bulk of the money going to charities. Many showed up in tank tops and shorts to soak up the sun on the warmest day of the year (80 degrees).

Pro football

From one ball boy to another

The former Browns ball boy picked the former Browns ball boy.

Ohio State wide receiver Brian Robiskie, who spent three summers shagging balls at Cleveland’s training camp, was selected in the second round of the NFL draft by the Browns.

The son of former Browns coach Terry Robiskie joins new Cleveland coach Eric Mangini, who began his pro football career as a Browns ball boy under Bill Belichick.

John Blanchette Associated Press Associated Press


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