August 21, 2009 in Nation/World

Ridge links terror level, politics

Book claims pre-election bid by Rumsfeld, Ashcroft
Deb Riechmann And Eileen Sullivan Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

In this March 12, 2002, photo, Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge unveils a terrorism warning system in Washington.
(Full-size photo)

WASHINGTON – Former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge claims in a new book that he was pressured by other members of President George W. Bush’s Cabinet to raise the nation’s terror alert level just before the 2004 presidential election.

Ridge says he objected to raising the security level despite the urgings of former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and then-Attorney General John Ashcroft, according to a publicity release from Ridge’s publisher. In the end the alert level was not changed. Ridge said the episode convinced him to follow through with his plans to leave the administration; he resigned on Nov. 30, 2004.

Bush’s former homeland security adviser, Frances Townsend, said Thursday that politics never played a role in determining alert levels.

Two tapes were released by al-Qaida in the weeks leading up to the election – one by terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and the other by a man calling himself “Azzam the American.” Terrorism experts suspected that “Azzam the American” was Adam Gadahn, a 26-year-old Californian whom the FBI had been urgently seeking.

Townsend said the videotapes contained “very graphic” and “threatening” messages.

Townsend said that anytime there was a discussion of changing the alert level, she first spoke with Ridge and then, if necessary, called a meeting of the homeland security council comprising the secretaries of defense and homeland security, the attorney general and CIA and FBI directors. The group then made a recommendation to the president about whether the color-coded threat level should be raised.

“Never were politics ever discussed in this context in my presence,” she said.

Ridge’s publicist, Joe Rinaldi, said Ridge was out of town and was not doing interviews until his book, “The Test of Our Times: America Under Siege … and How We Can Be Safe Again,” is released on Sept. 1.

In 2004, Ridge explained why he didn’t feel the alert should be raised. “We don’t have to go to (code level) orange to take action in response either to these tapes or just general action to improve security around the country,” he said then.

In 2005, months after he resigned, Ridge said his agency had been the most reluctant to raise the alert level. “There were times when some people were really aggressive about raising it, and we said, ‘For that?’ ” he said during a panel discussion in May 2005. But his book appears to be the first time he publicly attributes some of the pressure to politics.

The Homeland Security Department, which Ridge was the first person to lead, faced criticism in 2004 from Democrats who alleged that raising the alert level was designed to boost support for the Bush administration during an election year.

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