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December 15, 2009 in City
Douglas King photo

A killdeer is seen on the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge in this undated photo.

Douglas King photo

Allium geyeri, Geyer’s onion, blooms on the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge.

Douglas King photo

White-lavendar Geyer’s onion (allium geyeri) and blue camas (Camassia quamish) bloom in vernal pools on the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge in this undated photo. The pools are depressions on the refuge that fill with water. As it dries up, different flowers crop up, forming concentric rings of color around the pools.

Douglas King photo

White-lavendar Geyer’s onion (allium geyeri) and blue camas (Camassia quamish) bloom in vernal pools on the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge in this undated photo. The pools are depressions on the refuge that fill with water. As it dries up, different flowers crop up, forming concentric rings of color around the pools.

Douglas King photo

White-lavendar Geyer’s onion (allium geyeri) and blue camas (Camassia quamish) bloom in vernal pools on the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge in this undated photo. The pools are depressions on the refuge that fill with water. As it dries up, different flowers crop up, forming concentric rings of color around the pools.

Douglas King photo

Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge manager Mike Rule, left, and Robin Stanton walk near vernal pools on the refuge surrounded by blooming plants. The yellow blooms in the foreground are from nine-leaved lomatium (Lomatium triternatum), according to Rule, and the blueish blooms are from blue camas (Camassia quamash). The landforms are depressions that fill with water seasonally, and as it dries up, different plants come into bloom.