July 2, 2009 in Nation/World

Oscar-winning actor Karl Malden, 97, dies

Roles included ‘Streetcar,’ ‘Streets of San Francisco’
Beth Harris Associated Press
 
File Associated Press photo

Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas are shown in 1975 in a scene from, “The Streets of San Francisco.” Malden died of natural causes Wednesday.
(Full-size photo)

LOS ANGELES – Karl Malden, the Academy Award-winning actor whose intelligent characterizations on stage, screen and television made him a star despite his plain looks, died Wednesday, his family said. He was 97.

Malden died of natural causes surrounded by his family at his Brentwood home.

While he tackled a variety of characters over the years, he was often seen in working-class garb or military uniform. His authenticity in grittier roles came naturally: He was the son of a Czech mother and a Serbian father, and worked for a time in the steel mills of Gary, Ind., after dropping out of college.

Malden said he got his celebrated bulbous nose when he broke it a couple of times playing basketball or football, joking that he was “the only actor in Hollywood whose nose qualifies him for handicapped parking.”

Malden won a supporting actor Oscar in 1951 for his role as Blanche DuBois’ naive suitor Mitch in “A Streetcar Named Desire” – a role he also played on Broadway.

He was nominated again as best supporting actor in 1954 for his performance as Father Corrigan, a fearless, friend-of-the-workingman priest in “On the Waterfront.” In both movies, he costarred with Marlon Brando.

“When you worked with him, he was the character,” said Eva Marie Saint, who garnered a supporting actress Oscar for her role in “Waterfront.” “He was the consummate actor and he loved acting. He was dear and smart. Whatever he did he enjoyed life.”

Among his other memorable roles were: “Birdman of Alcatraz” opposite Burt Lancaster; “I Confess” with Montgomery Clift; “How the West Was Won;” and “The Cincinnati Kid” opposite Steve McQueen and Edward G. Robinson.

His more than 50 credits included “Patton,” in which he played Gen. Omar Bradley, “Pollyanna,” “Fear Strikes Out,” “The Sting II,” “Bombers B-52,” “Cheyenne Autumn,” and “All Fall Down.”

Malden gained perhaps his greatest fame as Lt. Mike Stone in the 1970s television show “The Streets of San Francisco,” in which Michael Douglas played the veteran detective’s junior partner.

Douglas was 28 when he earned his first major break on the detective series with Malden, who was 60. Douglas saluted Malden last month as a key mentor when the older actor received the American Film Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award, an event to be televised July 19 on the TV Land channel.

“He was fantastic. He just had a tremendous discipline, tremendous ethics,” Douglas told AP Television News at the ceremony. “He insisted that next week’s script would be there when we were shooting that week’s script. Every time between setups, between breaks, we’d go in the trailer and run lines for the next week’s show. That’s the kind of discipline, training I got from Karl.”

In the ’70s, Malden gained a lucrative 21-year sideline and a place in pop culture with his “Don’t leave home without them” ads for American Express travelers checks.

He acted sparingly in recent years, appearing in 2000 in a small role on TV’s “The West Wing.”

In 2004, Malden received the Screen Actors Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award, telling the group in his acceptance speech that “this is the peak for me.”

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