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July 22, 2009 in News
Jesse Tinsley photo

Henry Stensgar, nicknamed “Hobo”, swings a giant pole and a snagging rig to catch salmon below the Chief Joseph dam on the Columbia River Wednesday, July 15, 2009. The right to fish these native waters, and use nets and snagging, is part of the right of natives of the region. A short ways downstream from the dam, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are planning a new salmon hatchery. JESSE TINSLEY jesset@spokesman.com

Jesse Tinsley photo

Henry “Hobo” Stensgar shows four large salmon he caught in two days at the Chief Joseph Dam Wednesday, July 17, 2009 on the Columbia River. JESSE TINSLEY jesset@spokesman.com

Jesse Tinsley photo

Jesse Tinsley photo

Jesse Tinsley photo

The Colville tribes have their own small hatchery, but will soon have a $45M facility dedicated to salmon and mostly paid for by the Bonneville Power Administration.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Joe Carden, an Indian who also works at the the Colville fish hatchery, stands above the Columbia River Wednesday, July 15, 2009. The hatchery that exists now is for non-anadromous fish, such as trout.

Jesse Tinsley photo

The Colville tribes of Indians fishing boat, the DreamCatcher, offloads their catch of fish Wednesday, July 15, 2009 at a riverside landing on the Okanagan River near its mouth on the Columbia. The tribe harvests only hatchery fish with their nets, returning any wild fish to the river for spawning.

Jesse Tinsley photo

When the hatches are opened on the boat contracted by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation fisheries department, the bounty of the Columbia river is revealed Wednesday, July 15, 2009. Returning hatchery-raised sockeye and chinook salmon were caught and kept for food while wild fish were returned to the river for spawning. The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation government is in the design stages of building a salmon hatchery near the dam. JESSE TINSLEY jesset@spokesman.com

Jesse Tinsley photo

Shelly Davis, center, and Raynee Innes, right, transfer chinook and sockeye salmon from a large cooler into a giant plastic tote in the back of a truck after the Colville Reservation fishermen brought back more than a thousand fish to be shared with tribal members Wednesday, July 16, 2009 on the banks of the Okanagan River near its mouth on the Columbia. These are returning hatchery fish—wild fish were returned to the water to spawn—and will feed members of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation from distribution points around the reservation. The tribal government is partnering with various agencies to build a new salmon hatchery nearby, below the Chief Joseph Dam on the Columbia. JESSE TINSLEY jesset@spokesman.com

Jesse Tinsley photo

James Ives helps unload sockey and chinook salmon from the Colville tribes’ fishing boat Wednesday, July 15, 2009 at a landing along the Okanagan River.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Mike McKinley, a helper on the Colville tribes’ fishing boat, holds up one of the larger Columbia River salmon caught, probably over 30 lbs. according to one estimate.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Joe Peone, right, the head of the fisheries department of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, helps unload coolers full of sockey and chinook salmon at a landing on the Okanagan River Wednesday, July 15, 2009.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Raynee Innes ices down chinook and sockeye salmon in a giant plastic tote in the back of a truck after the Colville Reservation fishermen brought back more than a thousand fish to be shared with tribal members Wednesday, July 16, 2009 on the banks of the Okanagan River near its mouth on the Columbia. These are returning hatchery fish—wild fish were returned to the water to spawn—and will feed members of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation from distribution points around the reservation.