June 9, 2009 in Nation/World

Court mandates recusal in major donors’ cases

Mark Sherman Associated Press
 

Other decisions

On Monday, the Supreme Court:

Ruled that the current government in Iraq cannot be held responsible for the actions of Saddam Hussein’s regime. The high court unanimously turned away lawsuits from Americans who were held in Iraq during the Gulf War. The court said a federal law enacted in 2003 gave Iraq back the immunity that was stripped because of the Hussein government’s designation as a sponsor of terrorism.

Refused to hear a Marine’s lawsuit blaming the government’s dumping of toxic chemicals at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina for his son’s illnesses. Donal McLean Snyder Jr. argued that the dumping of trichloroethylene, an ingredient in cleaning solvents, into the ground in the 1970s polluted the water and made his son ill.

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court ruled Monday that elected judges must step aside from cases when large campaign contributions from interested parties create the appearance of bias.

By a 5-4 vote in a case from West Virginia, the court said that a judge who remained involved in a lawsuit filed against the company of the most generous supporter of his election deprived the other side of the constitutional right to a fair hearing.

“Just as no man is allowed to be a judge in his own cause, similar fears of bias can arise when – without the consent of the other parties – a man chooses the judge in his own cause,” Justice Anthony Kennedy said for the court.

With multimillion-dollar judicial election campaigns on the rise, the court’s decision Monday could have widespread significance. Justice at Stake, which tracks campaign spending in judicial elections, says judges are elected in 39 states and that candidates for the highest state courts have raised more than $168 million since 2000.

The West Virginia case involved over $3 million spent by the chief executive of Massey Energy Co. to help elect state Supreme Court Justice Brent Benjamin. At the same time, Massey was appealing a verdict, which now totals $82.7 million with interest, in a dispute with a local coal company. Benjamin refused to step aside from the case, despite repeated requests, and was part of a 3-2 decision to overturn the verdict.

The coal company took the case to the high court.

“Not every campaign contribution by a litigant or attorney creates a probability of bias that requires a judge’s recusal, but this is an exceptional case,” Kennedy said.

Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter and John Paul Stevens joined Kennedy’s opinion.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in dissent that he shares concerns about maintaining an impartial judiciary, but feared that “the court’s decision will undermine rather than promote these values.”

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