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Taylor Swift guests on ‘CSI’

Taylor Swift, actress?

That’s the pleasant surprise in a twisty episode of “CSI” tonight at 9 on CBS.

Nick Stokes (George Eads) considers the metamorphosis of teen Haley Jones (played by country singer Swift) as he investigates a series of murders at a shabby motel run by her parents.

Swift, who comes to the Spokane Arena on May 14 (tickets go on sale Friday), aces this early acting assignment; she is also in the upcoming Hannah Montana movie.

Haley’s story is the hour’s central mystery, and Swift ranges from plucky charmer to sullen rebel. Her look changes – she has four hairstyles – to underscore the evolution.

‘High School,’ year four

The Disney Channel is going back to school with “High School Musical 4.”

The fourth iteration of the popular musical franchise will begin production later this year and premiere in 2010.

Disney says the latest sequel will introduce a new cast of characters and will focus on a cross-town school rivalry.

“High School Musical” drew an audience of 7.7 million when it debuted in 2006. “High School Musical 2” more than doubled viewership of the original with 17.2 million in 2007.

“High School Musical 3” was released in theaters in 2008 and made more than $40 million its opening weekend.

‘Bachelor’ defended

The executive producer of “The Bachelor” says Jason Mesnick’s change of heart was not staged.

Mike Fleiss says producers of the ABC dating show did not create the outcome of Monday’s season finale that prompted viewer outrage when Mesnick dumped his first choice for the runner-up.

Mesnick, a 32-year-old single dad from Seattle, proposed to Melissa Rycroft in New Zealand. But in the subsequent “After the Final Rose” special, taped six weeks later, he dumped Rycroft because he still had feelings for runner-up Molly Malaney, whom he’s since started dating.

An angry torrent of viewers, including “The View” co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck and former “Bachelor” runner-up and “Bachelorette” star Trista Rehn, have lashed out at Mesnick over his abrupt change of heart.

“The great thing about unscripted television is that it’s unpredictable, and that’s what this was,” said Fleiss. “It caught us off guard. It caught the viewers off guard.”


 
Tags: television

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