March 10, 2009 in Features

Make up with mom-to-be

Kathy Mitchell And Marcy Sugar
 

Dear Annie: My 28-year-old son who I love dearly is living with his pregnant girlfriend, “Salome,” in my basement. He is due to earn his bachelor’s degree in three months, and the child is due around the same time.

Salome does not know how to cook and doesn’t have a job. She collects disability for ADHD and is taking classes at the local community college. She sleeps until she is ready to get up and then does nothing. Occasionally, I need access to my laundry room, and I cringe at the sight of the mess. The girl doesn’t seem to care about the pigsty they’ve created, yet she says she doesn’t want to live with her family during her pregnancy because of the unclean conditions there.

Recently we had a heated argument because she reacted negatively when I requested she reduce the list of attendees to her baby shower, which is being held at my home. Unfortunately, a lot of nasty things were said and now I have no relationship with her at all.

I am now alienated from them while they live in my house. I want them to leave, but my son has asked me to hang on until he completes college and gets a job. I’d like to move closer to my family. I applied for a part-time job in my old hometown and am praying I will get it. What do I do in the meantime? – Can’t Live Like This

Dear Can’t Live: Salome sounds very immature, and based on her family’s description, we can only assume she never learned how to clean a house. It’s too bad you’re no longer close enough to teach her. However, your son also lives in the basement and is equally responsible for keeping things tidy. We cannot imagine how they are going to manage with a child.

Give your son a deadline for moving out, and offer to help him look for an apartment. Use the time to try to make peace with Salome, since she is going to be the mother of your grandchild.

Dear Annie: I have worked for many years in a small office that includes receptionists, medical assistants, nurses and doctors. One of the younger women is getting married this summer. She is friendly to me and we work well together.

I believe most of the other people in this office have been invited to the wedding, but not me. People are starting to discuss the event, which is a bit hurtful.

How do I be gracious about this and not take it personally? Am I supposed to get a card or gift for the bride? I sure don’t feel like it. – Medically Competent Lady

Dear Lady: Office invitations are tricky because, while friendly, you are not always close enough to be invited. It is inconsiderate of the others to chatter on about it, but it is still appropriate for you to send the bride a card with your good wishes.

Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar write for Creators Syndicate.


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