March 20, 2009 in Features

‘Dollhouse’ enjoys growing fan base

Maria Elena Fernandez Los Angeles Times
 

Tonight

‘The Dollhouse’ airs at 9 p.m. tonight on KAYU channel 28 and Fox cable channel 3

HOLLYWOOD – The rocky road of Joss Whedon’s “Dollhouse” series on Fox has been well-documented, but Whedon is very excited about tonight’s episode, “Man on the Street,” which he wrote, and the fact that his audience grew by 21 percent last week to 4.3 million viewers. The following are excerpts from a conference call with reporters Wednesday.

Question: Viewers have complained of the “ick factor” of the premise. Most of the dolls are there voluntarily, but knowing that at least one isn’t, doesn’t that continue to make the show uncomfortable?

Answer: It makes me uncomfortable. I’m not going to lie. For me, it’s part of what we’re dealing with. We’re dealing with people who have power and are abusing it, and people who don’t and are trying to regain it. In some instances, we want to show the “Dollhouse” is providing a service that somebody is looking for. And in other instances, that’s going to be abused and the ick factor gets very high.

Q: Do you think there might have been a negative side effect to all the interviews you did emphasizing that (today’s episode) was where you wanted people to get hooked?

A: “Man on the Street” came to me as a concept really quickly. And for the first time, there was a real simpatico (with the network). I wrote it faster than anything I’ve ever written. It just poured out of me. All of that brewing we’d been doing became the soup for that episode. It really was a game changer for us on-set and in production. Other people may feel differently, but we walked away from shooting that episode going, “OK, we’ve just added a layer, and we feel pretty excited about it.”

Q: Did you just need time to find the show or did the network relent?

A: It was kind of both. “Man on the Street” definitely contains elements that were pitched by or developed by people at the network in terms of the motivations of the Dollhouse and the feel of the politics of the thing and the thriller aspect. It wasn’t like, “Oh, now they’ve shut up, and now we’ll do it my way.” But it also is, storytelling-wise, much more how I had envisioned coming at it. It was really finding the code to a show that I can do my best work in and the network can still get behind. It was a meeting of the minds.

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