March 26, 2009 in City

Pharmacy robberies stop with arrests

Meghann M. Cuniff Staff writer
 

No pharmacy robberies have been reported in Spokane since the arrests of a young couple charged with a string of gunpoint holdups that included a Shopko robbed of OxyContin as well as payday loan stores.

Police believe the two were using the payday cash to buy OxyContin, a trade name for the drug oxycodone, which produces a heroin-like high when pills are crushed, then injected, smoked or snorted.

The pills can fetch up to $100 each on the black market, depending on the dosage.

Zachary T. Allen, 19, and Kimberley A. Norman, 20, remain in Spokane County Jail and are among at least seven inmates charged with pharmacy robberies.

In Sandpoint, a Las Vegas man was arrested March 11 after police say he robbed the White Cross pharmacy of all its OxyContin, the Bonner County Daily Bee reported. Zachariah D. Lindberg, 22, remains in the Bonner County Jail on a $15,000 bond.

In Missoula, a 2006 Central Valley High School graduate and University of Montana student was jailed March 4 on a federal robbery charge in connection with three gunpoint robberies.

Daniel W. Nania, 21, is being held without bail after a fingerprint linked him to three robberies at a Missoula Walgreens, according to federal court documents. He was arrested at his home with more than $3,000 and 10,000 prescription pills, including OxyContin, documents show.

His father, Dr. James Nania, emergency room director at Deaconess Medical Center, hired Missoula lawyer John E. Smith to defend him.

Smith said that because Nania is accused of robbing a certified pharmacist, not a store clerk, federal charges can apply.

But at the federal level, his alleged use of a BB gun in the robberies makes a difference.

“He won’t be punished quite as harshly, but it is still very serious,” Smith said.

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