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Idaho Voices

New Hayden office building invites professional tenants

Sun., Oct. 4, 2009

An auspicious, 27,000-square-foot building has suddenly risen in the southeast corner of Hayden. The three-level place is alone on 1.5 acres in what was a field on Wayne Street – northeast of the Prairie Avenue-Government Way intersection.

Its focus is professional with emphasis on the construction industries, such as architecture, engineering, surveying, etc. Thus two of the initial occupants will be two of the owners – G.D. (Gordon) Longwell Architects and (Jim) Coleman Engineering. The third owner is Cory Trapp, thus the name of LCT Office Building.

Longwell’s and Coleman’s businesses have 3,300 and 1,100 square feet, respectively. About 60 percent of the space is spoken for, but four spaces, from 650 to 3,100 square feet each, are available. Other occupants of a professional nature are definitely welcome, Longwell said. Completion should be before Jan. 1 with tenant improvements to follow.

Amenities include heated parking, a lower-level storage area and a ground-source heat pump. Three wells provide water through a heat exchanger for energy conservation and to lower costs, Longwell said. For information, contact him at (208) 661-2083.

Construction starts on Post Falls Chamber

Groundbreaking was Thursday on the new Post Falls Chamber of Commerce building next to City Hall. Completion of the 5,900-square-foot offices and visitor center on the first floor will be next summer. The second floor will be leased.

Reflecting on the chamber’s support of the annual powwow in the event center, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe is sponsoring the building’s conference room and patio for $25,000 each. Tiles and pavers for the project can be purchased for $300 and $500. Donations such as furniture, display racks and labor are encouraged. Call (208) 773-3843.

The chamber’s current 1,600-square-foot offices on Sixth Street will be leased to the city for art and dancing classes.

Two restaurant changes related

Both places were called Down the Street. Now neither one is – not quite.

Leisa Wagner owned both Down the Street restaurants in Post Falls and Coeur d’Alene. She recently sold the Coeur d’Alene place at 1613 Sherman Ave. to Jim Purtee, who renamed it Jimmy’s Down the Street. To avoid confusion, Wagner changed the name of her Post Falls place at 203 E. Seltice Way to The Corner Café.

Both places have new, expanded menus for breakfast and lunch. Jimmy’s Down the Street has been renovated and has new sidewalks. Call (208) 765-3868. The Corner Café has added snacks and an Octoberfest specialty. Call (208) 773-3785.

Antique Corner owners retiring

Gerry and Mary Ann McCray, who have had Antique Corner at 1104 Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene, are retiring. They have had the business for four years and will close at the end of October. They came to North Idaho in 1986 from the San Joaquin Valley in California.

With 20 dealers and an end-of-business sale, open hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Call (208) 667-8250. The 8,100-square-foot building, which originally housed Fossum Paints, is for sale through Coldwell Banker Realty at (208) 745-4300.

This week’s tidbits

•Northwest Specialty Hospital at 1593 Polston Ave., Post Falls, has added an occupational medicine program. Services include management and treatment of injured workers with minimal waiting time, continual communication with employers, continuity of care and quick return of workers to a functional status. Specialists are Drs. J. Craig Stevens and Harry Downs. Call (208) 262-2300 or check www.nwsh.com.

•Paddy’s Tavern at 601 W. Appleway, Coeur d’Alene, has closed.

•The intersection at Government Way and Appleway needs revamping. Northbound traffic on Government Way often is backed up all the way to Ironwood, especially in the later afternoon. Maybe this will be eased when midtown construction on Fourth Street is completed, but more lanes and/or right-turn-only lanes would help.

Contact Nils Rosdahl at (208) 769-3228 or nhrosdahl@nic.edu.

 

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