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Annie’s Mailbox: Mother’s right: Don’t chase him

Dear Annie: I’m a 14-year-old girl who is having relationship problems. My new boyfriend and I just hooked up over the weekend. “Carter” and I go to church together, and he has always been my best friend. I was too shy to ask him out myself, so I had my friend “Justin” help me.

We got together while our youth group met at church. Everything was going perfectly. We were holding hands and cuddling. But on Sunday morning during greeting at church, Justin came up to me and said Carter told him I’m weird to be with and there’s another girl he likes more.

Justin isn’t very happy with Carter, and neither am I. We both talked to my mother, and she said I should back off and let Carter chase after me if he’s interested. She says she doesn’t want me to appear too easy. Is she right? What should I do? – Perfect Relationship Gone Wrong

Dear Perfect: Listen to your mother. Spending a morning holding hands and cuddling does not constitute a relationship. Carter was interested enough to check you out, but apparently not enough to consider you his girlfriend. It’s also possible Justin is giving you inaccurate information. Either way, it’s best if you let Carter make the next move.

Dear Annie: I find trick-or-treating annoying. I was raised in a religious group that didn’t celebrate Halloween. My mother hated having to answer the door constantly and took out her anger on me. I once suggested we stop opening the door or put up a sign saying, “No Trick-or-Treating here, please,” but she wouldn’t. I think she was afraid they’d throw eggs.

My brother and I still find it irritating. I don’t want my doorbell ringing all night. What can I do to keep them away? – Elizabeth, N.J.

Dear N.J.: It’s too bad you can’t enjoy greeting children with a smile and brightening their day once a year. Most parents supervise their kids and prefer they stay within familiar territory. And most kids will skip unwelcoming homes where the lights are off or the treat is a breath mint.



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