October 22, 2009 in City
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Tom Martin stirkes a pose on the marble steps inside the lobby of the Carlyle Care Center on Oct. 21, 2009, in Spokane. Martin said he’s lived at the Carlyle almost since it reopened as a care center. He’s gone on several Carlyle camping outings. “Everything’s taken care of for us,” he said. “All our needs are met.”

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Wendy Coram is the administrator at the Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane.

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The Carlyle Hotel was built in 1892 in downtown Spokane and now houses the Carlyle Care Center.

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Nancy Lund is thankful she has found a place to live at the Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane. Lund, a former nurse’s aide, has struggled with depression and bipolar disorder. She spent about six months at Eastern State Hospital before coming to the Carlyle. She praises the Carlyle’s staff, activities and food. “I’m afraid that if I got into my own apartment that I would get depressed, close the curtain and not eat,” Lund said.

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Nancy Lund is thankful she has found a place to live at the Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane. Lund, a former nurse’s aide, has struggled with depression and bipolar disorder. She said the staff keeps an important balance between freedom and oversight. When she once was caught with alcohol in her room, she lost some privileges until she worked to “build bridges,” Lund said. “They’re very caring and they can read into what we can’t see,” she said. “They have compassion.”

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Mary Johne shares her seventh floor room with Nancy Lund at the Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane. Johne moved into the Carlyle in November 2003 after a stay at Eastern State Hospital. Before that, she was homeless for about a year, she said. At the Carlyle, Johne, who has bipolar disorder, said she’s made significant progress and even works at Christ Kitchen in food preparation. She said she’s a big fan of activities at the Carlyle, especially karaoke. “They make you feel very individualized and important here,” she said.

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Mary Johne shares her seventh floor room with Nancy Lund at the Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane. Johne moved into the Carlyle in November 2003 after a stay at Eastern State Hospital. Before that, she was homeless for about a year, she said. At the Carlyle, Johne, who has bipolar disorder, said she’s made significant progress and even works at Christ Kitchen in food preparation. She said she’s a big fan of activities at the Carlyle, especially karaoke. “They make you feel very individualized and important here,” she said.

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Navy veteran Dennis Winant, 57, has lived at the Carlyle about four years. He’s a news junkie who spends much of his time writing and listening to his short-wave radio. “People can live their lives (at the Carlyle) without people taking advantage of you,” Winant said. “They’re able to live without that stress.”

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Priscilla Shadowens has much praise for the people and the living environment at the Carlyle Hotel. Shadowens, a former resident of the New Madison Apartments downtown, said the Carlyle’s staff has helped her deal with her struggles with behavioral problems. Without the Carlyle, “I’d be homeless,” Shadowens said Oct. 21, 2009.

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Carlyle resident Priscilla Shadowens, left, gets a hug from visitor Mickey Johnson as the two enter the hotel’s elevator Oct. 21, 2009. Shadowens, a former resident of the New Madison Apartments downtown, said the Carlyle’s staff has helped her deal with her struggles with behavioral problems. Without the Carlyle, “I’d be homeless,” Shadowens said.

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Genghis guards the top of the stairs in the lobby of the Carlyle Care Center on Oct. 21, 2009, in Spokane. The dog belongs to Carlyle administrator Wendy Coram.