September 17, 2009 in Sports

In brief: Blue Mountain hunters should expect road delays

From Staff Reports
 

Blue Mountains hunters may experience delays on main roads into prime bear and elk hunting areas this fall.

Salvage logging will be underway until the snow piles up to reduce danger from snags along roads in areas burned by forest fires.

Much of the logging is focused on three main roads heading out five or more miles in all directions from the Godman area in the Pomeroy District.

Waterfowling clinics set

A weekend devoted to waterfowling skills and gear is planned at the Cabela’s store in Post Falls on Oct. 2-25.

Nine different free clinics and activities are scheduled each day, including a calling contest for kids.

•Waterfowl Mania at Wholesale Sports in Spokane Valley will include some talks by waterfowl gear reps on Sept. 26.

Reduce lead exposure

Game killed with lead bullets could pose health risks to people who eat the meat unless it’s properly handled, studies have shown.

Ground venison is much more likely than steaks to contain some lead, according to studies conducted in several states.

Some common sense rules can increase the safety of consuming game meat:

•Take clean shots.

•Trim meat well away from the wound channel.

•Consider using copper bullets instead of lead.

DNR updates maps

Six updated maps showing state, federal and other public lands in sections of Washington have recently been published by the Washington Department of Natural Resources.

The maps, which are popular with hunters and other outdoor recreationists, are part of a set of 49 maps produced by DNR, the state’s official mapping agency.

The updated 1:100,000-scale maps are titled Clarkston, Colville, Republic, Skykomish River, Wenatchee and Yakima.

In addition to showing state DNR lands, the maps identify lands managed by the State Parks and Fish and Wildlife departments as well as several federal agencies.

DNR maps can be purchased at Northwest Map and Travel Book Center in downtown Spokane or online through DNR, www.dnr.wa.gov/

Idaho hikes nonresident fees

Out-of-state hunters are in for some sticker shock when they buy Idaho hunting and fishing licenses.

Starting May 1, Idaho chose to increase fees for nonresidents but not for residents.

For example, the state legislature raised the nonresident season fishing license from $82 to $98.25 and a season hunting license from $141.50 to $154.75.

The cost of a nonresident elk tag increased from $372.50 to $416.75.

Sidearm rule relaxed

Some primitive weapon hunters in Washington may take a centerfire sidearm along for personal protection during archery and muzzleloader seasons under a new rule approved by the legislature.

Bowhunters and blackpowder hunters must have a concealed weapons permit to qualify for carrying the handguns.

The modern handguns may not be used to dispatch game wounded with the primitive weapons.

Possession limits tricky

Because federal law applies to migratory birds, there’s a difference in possession limits between waterfowl and upland birds in Idaho.

If you shoot a limit of four geese and shoot four more the next day, you have reached your possession limit. Those birds count in your possession limit even after they are frozen, smoked or processed.

The geese must be consumed or given away – accompanied by a properly filled out proxy form – before they no longer count against the limit.

The possession limit for upland birds ends when the birds are at their final place of consumption.

Lights help see red

LED lamps can be especially helpful for blood-trailing game after dark.

Red and blue LED lamps enhance night vision and spots of blood.

Red blood becomes almost fluorescent under this color combination and can be seen clearly on reddish and brown leaves.


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