April 4, 2010 in Features

Poet David Daniel to read at Whitworth

By The Spokesman-Review
 

David Daniel, the former poetry editor of the prestigious literary journal Ploughshares, will give the annual Endowed English Reader lecture at Whitworth University on Friday.

Harold Bloom once called Daniel “an authentic heir to Hart Crane.” The director of the undergraduate creative writing program at Fairleigh-Dickinson University in New Jersey, Daniel founded that school’s well-known Words and Music Festival, which has featured Bruce Springsteen, Rick Moody and Jonathan Demme, to name just a few.

Daniel’s poetry collections include “Seven-Star Bird” and “Crash and Other Assorted Love Songs.”

His reading will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Robinson Teaching Theatre in Weyerhaeuser Hall on the Whitworth campus. Admission is free, and a book sale and reception will follow.

‘New Poets’

Speaking of poets, Sandpoint’s Lost Horse Press has just published the fourth volume in its “New Poets/Short Books” series, featuring the works of three poets:

Abby E. Murray’s “Me & Coyote.”

Jesse S. Fourmy’s “Last Night’s Fires and the Dwindling Embers of Evolution.”

Karen Holman’s “Welcoming in the Starry Night of Lightning Bees.”

The senior editor of the collection is Marvin Bell, who says that the volume has “three strong voices, each with a personal brand of courage.”

An epic ‘Trek’

Alaskan authors Erin McKittrick and Bretwood “Hig” Higman will read from their book “A Long Trek Home: 4,000 Miles by Boot, Raft and Ski” on Wednesday, 6 p.m. at the Sandpoint Community Hall.

The authors journeyed from Seattle to the Aleutians by muscle power. It’s a story of rainstorms, blizzards, bears and tiny villages.

The event is free and sponsored by the Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness. The authors will sign books afterward.

Kellogg history stories

Julie Whitesel Weston, author of “The Good Times Are All Gone Now: Life, Death and Rebirth in an Idaho Mining Town,” will read from her book on Wednesday, 7 p.m. at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave.

Weston grew up near the Bunker Hill Mine in Kellogg. Her book tells the story of Kellogg and the mines in the mid-20th century.

The reading is free.

Reading/writing retreat

No, it’s not too early to start thinking about the Northwest Inland Writing Project’s Summer Reading/Writing Retreat, July 12-16.

This retreat will give you uninterrupted time to write and read. And you can also attend workshops and conferences with visiting writer Bill Woolum, who teaches at Lane Community College in Eugene, Ore.

It all takes place at Camp N-Sid-Sen on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

Registration is due by June 15. Go to www.niwp.org for more info.

EWU Library book sale

The Eastern Washington University Friends of the Library will hold its annual used books and recording sale Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. in the lobby of the JFK Library on the Cheney campus.

The sale includes books and recordings which are being replaced in the library’s collection, as well as items donated by the public.

It’s a great way to fill up your bookshelves, cheap.

An autism story

Oregon writer Eileen Garvin has written a deeply felt memoir about growing up – mostly in Spokane – with her autistic sister.

Here’s a sample passage, discussing the family’s attempts to eat at a restaurant: “Margaret would get booted for throwing food or silverware or for yelling. Then she’d make a grand exit, sometimes laughing and sometimes kicking and screaming. Or maybe singing.”

Garvin will read from “How To Be a Sister: A Love Story With a Twist of Autism” (The Experiment Publishing, $15) at Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave., on Wednesday at 7 p.m.

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