April 11, 2010 in Features

Nethercutt book puts musical spin on history

By The Spokesman-Review
 
File Associated Press photo

In his new book, former U.S. Rep. George Nethercutt uses songs to tell the story of our nation’s beginning.
(Full-size photo)

Former U.S. Congressman George R. Nethercutt Jr. is planning three presentations for his just-published book, “In Tune With America: Our History in Song.”

The book, which Nethercutt wrote with Tom M. McArthur of Spokane, his former press secretary, uses songs from the past to tell the story of our country’s history from its beginnings.

“Songs are often written by people who are witnesses to history,” said Nethercutt in a press release. “… It puts you there with words and music in the way no other history book does.”

The book is described as an “approachable, easy-to-read, non-partisan narrative” for readers of all ages.

Nethercutt will read from and sign his book at these locations:

•Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave., Wednesday, 7 p.m.

•The Coeur d’Alene Press, 201 N. Second Street, Coeur d’Alene, Friday, 2 p.m.

•River Park Square Atrium, 808 W. Main Ave., Saturday, 3 p.m.

Visiting writer events

Three authors are headlining separate visiting-writer-series events this week:

Susan Orlean, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., University of Idaho’s Law School Courtroom, 711 Rayburn, Moscow – Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker and author of “The Orchid Thief” and “The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup.”

She is at the campus for a week as a Distinguished Visiting Writer; this event is free and open to the public.

Anne Waldman, Thursday, 7:30 p.m., Kimbrough Music Building, Room 101, Washington State University, Pullman – Waldman is a celebrated poet and performance artist. One of the youngest of the “beat” poets and co-founder of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, she has written more than 40 poetry books and has been a key figure in the experimental poetry community for more than four decades.

This event is part of WSU’s Visiting Writers Series, and is free and open to the public.

Tod Marshall, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Cataldo Globe Room at Gonzaga University – Marshall, who teaches at GU, has been published in many prestigious literary reviews. His first collection of poetry, “Dare Say,” won an award from the University of Georgia’s Contemporary Poetry Series. His most recent collection is “The Tangled Line.”

This is the final event of the season in Gonzaga’s Visiting Writers Series. It’s free and open to the public.

There also will be a question-and-answer session with Marshall at 4 p.m. Tuesday in College Hall, Room 128.

‘The Walk’ author

Richard Paul Evans will read from and sign his new book, “The Walk” (Simon and Schuster, $22) on Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at the South Hill Hastings, 2512 E. 29th Ave.

Spokane is a fitting setting for this reading, since the book is about a man who loses everything through misfortune, and decides to walk from Bellevue, Wash., to Key West, Fla. In this book, he makes it all the way to … Spokane.

This volume is the first in what is planned as an inspirational series. Evans’ previous novel, “The Christmas Box,” was a national best-seller.

Fungi and games

Sandpoint’s Lost Horse Press has just released the most intriguing poetry title we’ve seen in a long time: “Decomposition: Fungi-Inspired Poems.”

Yes, this is an entire poetry volume about mushrooms – and related life forms. One poem is titled “Slime Molds.”

And in case you thought mushroom poetry was obscure, the list of poets in this volume includes D.H. Lawrence, Sherman Alexie, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Robert Penn Warren and Robert Bly.

The editors are Renee Roehl and Kelly Chadwick.

We’re guessing this book is earthy, rich and tasty.


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