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April 17, 2010 in News
Brynjar Gauti photo

The volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Brynjar Gauti photo

Volcanic ash seen over Iceland�s main ring road near Skogar, east of the eruption as the volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Brynjar Gauti photo

Farmers team up to rescue cattle from exposure to the toxic volcanic ash at a farm in Nupur, Iceland, as the volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Christine Cotter photo

Passengers wait in line to talk to agents at the Lufthansa check-in counter Saturday, April 17, 2010 at Los Angeles International Airport. Flights to Europe have been grounded due to ash from a volcano in Iceland.

Brynjar Gauti photo

Wearing a mask against the smoke, dairy farmer Berglind Hilmarsdottir from Nupur looks for cattle lost in the ash clouds as the volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Brynjar Gauti photo

The volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Brynjar Gauti photo

The volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Brynjar Gauti photo

The volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air Saturday, April 17, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land-bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini-eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer-term damage to world air travel and trade.

Arnar Thorisson/helicopter.is photo

This aerial image shows the crater spewing ash and plumes of grit at the summit of the volcano in southern Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier Saturday April 17, 2010. A lingering volcanic ash plume forced extended no-fly restrictions over much of Europe Saturday, as Icelandic scientists warned that volcanic activity had increased and showed no sign of abating _ a portent of more travel chaos to come. Although the ash plume has grown, a northerly wind was expected to allow enough visibility for scientists to fly over the volcano Saturday.

Robert Mecea photo

Fern Walters, 15, left, wearing a I Love NY sweat shirt, Katy Smith, 15, second left, Mollie Bowers, 16, center, Naomi Jones, 14, second right, and Madie Lonton, 16, right, a group of students from the Charles Dickens school in Kent, England pass the time in the lounge area in the Gershwin Hotel, in New York, Saturday, April 17, 2010, where they were stranded because of flight cancellations resulting from the volcanic eruption in Iceland. They were here to see the museums on a trip organized by their art class teacher.

Peter Dejong photo

Stranded travelers queue to buy train tickets at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Saturday April 17, 2010. A lingering volcanic ash plume forced extended no-fly restrictions over much of Europe on Saturday, as scientists warned that activity at a volcano in Iceland had increased and showed no sign of abating, a portent of more travel chaos to come.