December 13, 2010 in City

When it comes to kids’ literary wish lists, she’s got it covered

Adrian Rogers The Spokesman-Review
 
Molly Quinn photo


(Full-size photo)

How to give

By mail: Donations may be sent to The Spokesman-Review Christmas Fund, P.O. Box 516, Spokane, WA 99210.

In person: Drop off donations in the lobbies of Spokesman-Review offices in downtown Spokane (999 W. Riverside Ave.) or Coeur d’Alene (608 Northwest Blvd., Suite 200).

Online: Readers can donate at www.spokesman.com/sections/christmas-fund/. PayPal deducts a small amount from online donations for its services.

Christmas Bureau

Dates: This week: today through Dec. 18 and Dec. 20 (closed Sundays).

Time: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Where: Spokane County Fair and Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. in Spokane Valley.

What to bring: ID requirements have changed this year.

  • Adults must bring photo ID for themselves and every person living in the household older than 18, plus their latest utility bill or rent receipt showing their name and current physical address.

  • For children, parents must bring a letter, form or document from a school, day care center, DSHS office or other social service agency showing the child’s name, address, and age or date of birth. WIC folders will be accepted, too.

  • Social Security cards are not valid identification.

Tana Carosella, 67, stood ready behind stacks of books at the Christmas Bureau, greeting parents and asking their children’s ages and interests.

At the table for the littlest kids, ages 0 to 3, the answer to the latter Thursday was very often: “Trucks.” Carosella and other volunteers were prepared for this. She could offer, for starters, “Wheels on the Go” and “Vehicles.”

Carosella, of Spokane, knows what kids like, and she cares that they read. A member of a local chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa, a sorority for women educators, she works with Volunteers of America President Marilee Roloff to help spearhead the bureau’s book program.

Volunteers use part of the Christmas Fund money to purchase books throughout the year. At the bureau, they help parents match titles to their children’s ages and interests. When the bureau opened Thursday, they had 14,000 books to give away.

Unfortunately, not a single one of them was about potties, Carosella had to tell a mother of a 2-year-old boy.

She showed one baby’s mother copies of a sturdy board book called “Fun With Chick.”

“That would work for a small one to hold in their hands and to chew on, basically,” Carosella said. “That’s what they do.”

Another woman knew just what to get.

“Babies like the Spider-Man,” she said, holding up a selection whose cover bore the unitard-wearing superhero. “Spider-Man and cars.”


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