Nation/World

Guantanamo’s recidivism is high

Pentagon study may fuel debate on prison closure

WASHINGTON – One in five terror suspects released from the Guantanamo Bay prison has returned to the fight, according to a classified Pentagon report expected to stoke an already fierce debate over President Barack Obama’s plan to close the military prison.

The finding reflects an upward trend on the recidivism rate, although human rights activists who advocate closing the prison have questioned the validity of such numbers.

Early last year, the Pentagon reported that the rate of released detainees returning to militancy was 11 percent. In April, it was 14 percent. The latest figure was 20 percent, according to a U.S. official.

According to a senior administration official, the White House has not been presented with information that suggests that any of the detainees transferred during the Obama administration has returned to the fight.

Meanwhile, Republicans say the rising number suggests the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, cannot be closed because that would mean either releasing hardened terrorists back into the fight or moving them into U.S. prisons, which many Americans oppose.

“Guantanamo remains the proper place for holding terrorists, especially those who may not be able to be detained as securely in a third country,” Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday.

Although Obama said Tuesday that he still wants to close the detention facility, Defense Department press secretary Geoff Morrell suggested Wednesday that such plans were on hold. Congress has put severe limits on the endeavor.

“We are right now left without either the money or the authority to move detainees from Guantanamo Bay,” Morrell said.

Under significant political pressure, Obama has said he won’t release any more detainees to Yemen because of al-Qaida’s grip on that nation. Nearly half of the remaining 198 detainees at Guantanamo Bay are from Yemen.



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