Outdoors

Feds propose expanding Bush’s bull trout habitat

Bull trout, considered a threatened species throughout the Northwest, flourish in the clean, cold waters of Rapid River in the roadless area near Riggins, Idaho.
Bull trout, considered a threatened species throughout the Northwest, flourish in the clean, cold waters of Rapid River in the roadless area near Riggins, Idaho.

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — In another reversal of Bush administration Endangered Species Act policy, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to expand habitat protections for the bull trout, a fish that stands in the way of logging, mining and grazing on federal lands.

The agency Wednesday formally proposed designating 23,000 miles of streams and 533,000 acres of lakes and reservoirs in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Nevada as critical habitat. The area includes nearly 1,000 miles of marine shoreline in Washington.

An inspector general’s report had found the bull trout was one of 13 species whose protection was jeopardized by influence exerted by Bush administration appointee Julie MacDonald in the Department of Interior.



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