Nation/World


In brief: First Asian carp caught past barriers

THURSDAY, JUNE 24, 2010

CHICAGO – An Asian carp was found for the first time beyond electric barriers meant to keep the voracious invasive species out of the Great Lakes, state and federal officials said Wednesday, prompting renewed calls for swift action to block their advance.

Commercial fishermen landed the 3-foot-long, 20-pound bighead carp in Lake Calumet on Chicago’s South Side, about six miles from Lake Michigan, according to the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

Officials said they need more information to determine the significance of the find.

Scientists and fishermen fear that if the carp become established in the lakes, they could starve out popular sport species and ruin the region’s $7 billion fishing industry. Asian carp can grow to 4 feet and 100 pounds and eat up to 40 percent of their body weight daily.

Filibuster likely to kill benefit extension

WASHINGTON – A Republican filibuster appears increasingly likely to kill long-sought legislation extending jobless benefits and a host of other spending and tax measures, despite a new round of cuts to the measure Wednesday that reduced its deficit impact.

A senior Senate Democratic aide said Wednesday evening that several days of negotiations with a handful of moderate Republicans had failed and that a vote this week to break the filibuster was likely to fail.

Failure to pass the bill would mean about 200,000 jobless people a week would lose benefits that average more than $300 a week because they would be unable to reapply for additional tiers of benefits enacted since 2008. Governors denied help with their budget woes are likely to lay off tens of thousands of state workers.

Imprisoned ex-mayor charged again

DETROIT – Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, already in prison for probation violations, was indicted Wednesday on federal fraud and tax charges, accused of turning a charity into a personal slush fund for cash, travel, yoga, summer camp and even anti-bugging equipment.

The indictment said Kilpatrick, 40, created the Civic Fund in 1999 and gained tax-exempt status after declaring it would enhance neighborhoods, help youth and improve Detroit’s image.

Kilpatrick is charged with failing to report at least $640,000 in taxable income between 2003 and 2008, the value of his own expenses paid by the fund.

Draft rules curtail new doctors’ shifts

CHICAGO – Patients will be told when they’re being treated by rookie doctors, who would get shorter shifts and better supervision under proposed work changes for medical residents.

The draft regulations aim to promote patient safety and reduce medical errors by enhancing work conditions for junior physicians.

The proposal slightly revises regulations adopted seven years ago and would have the biggest impact on new doctors in their first year of residency training programs after graduating from medical school. They would be more closely supervised by experienced doctors and the maximum length of their shifts would be cut from 24 hours to 16 hours.


 

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