Nation/World

World in brief: Ash no-fly zones may get smaller

Brussels, Belgium – The European air safety agency proposed new procedures Wednesday that would drastically shrink the no-fly zone around volcanic ash particles – a move that should decrease future airspace closures and travel delays.

Daniel Hoeltgen, spokesman for the European aviation safety agency, said the new solution adopts the U.S. practice of imposing a 120-mile no-fly buffer zone for all aircraft in the vicinity of any visible ash plume. This no-fly zone is hundreds of miles smaller than the one used now in Europe.

Last month, a large part of European airspace was closed for five days when ash from the Icelandic volcano drifted over northern and western parts of the continent.

Sadr City bomb kills 7 youths

Baghdad – A bomb in a parked car ripped through a Sadr City neighborhood Wednesday evening, killing seven young people who had gathered at a nearby cafe to drink tea and play dominoes, Iraqi officials said.

The attack comes just days after a string of shootings and bombings convulsed the country in Iraq’s worst violence so far this year. The violence appears designed to stir up sectarian tensions at a time when Iraq still has no new government after inconclusive parliamentary elections and as U.S. troops prepare to go home.

Sadr City is the eastern Baghdad stronghold of anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr.



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