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May 17, 2010 in City
Courtesy photo photo

Mount St. Helens as it appeared before erupting in 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The first phreatic eruption at Mount St. Helens viewed by Barry Johnston, Trixie Anders and Jim Fitzgerald, approximately March 28, 1980. Many such steam explosions occurred leading up to Mount St. Helens’ major May 18 eruption.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Another phreatic eruption of Mount St. Helens witnessed by Barry Johnston, Trixie Anders and Jim Fitzgerald about March 30, 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Aerial photo of a phreatic eruption of Mount St. Helens in April 1980. Photographer unknown.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

This April 1980 aerial photo shows the east-west fracture zone on Mount St. Helens. Photographer unknown.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The bulge on Mount St. Helens in April 1980, looking west at the east-west fracture zone on the mountain’s north face. The bulge was growing by more than five feet per day in April, as recalled by Barry Johnston. Photographer unknown.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

A phreatic explosion of Mount St. Helens in April 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Mount St. Helens as seen by Barry Johnston, Trixie Anders and Jim Fitzgerald from Spud Mountain, six miles to the west May 17, 1980, the day before the eruption.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Mount St. Helens as seen by Barry Johnston, Trixie Anders and Jim Fitzgerald from Spud Mountain, six miles to the west May 17, 1980, the day before Mount St. Helens erupted.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders’ first glimpse of the eruption of Mount St. Helens at 8:33 a.m. on May 18, 1980. The two had stopped for breakfast in Toutle before driving up to their usual vantage point at Spud Mountain, a decision that saved their lives. Their friend Jim Fitzgerald, who had camped on the mountain, died in the blast.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The eruption of Mount St. Helens as seen by Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders at 8:33 a.m. on May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The eruption of Mount St. Helens as seen by Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders from the west at 8:33 a.m. May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The eruption of Mount St. Helens as seen by Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders from the west at 8:33 a.m. May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

After seeing a cloud of ash and debris heading their way at the Spud Mountain turnoff, Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders hurtled away from the blast in Johnston’s Jeep. This photo was taken from where they stopped, about 15 to 20 miles away from Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

The eruption as seen by Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders about 15 to 20 miles away from Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Looking back at the Mount St. Helens eruption from Toutle, Wash. It was like “an atomic bomb had detonated,” Barry Johnston recalls.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Looking back at the Mount St. Helens eruption from Toutle, Wash. It was like “an atomic bomb had detonated,” Barry Johnston recalls.

Courtesy of Barry Johnston photo

Barry Johnston and Trixie Anders escaped with their lives when Mount St. Helens erupted. But their friend Jim Fitzgerald, with whom they’d been camping that weekend,, did not. This is Fitzgerald’s Datsun, months after his body was recovered.