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May 17, 2010 in City
Courtesy of Tim Swartout photo

Tim Swartout cleans out his pool at 2642 E. 35th Avenue in Spokane after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy of Tim Swartout photo

Mark Swartout examines the ash on a car at his home at 2642 E. 35th in Spokane.

Courtesy of Lonna Stowe photo

Ron Stowe and his son Dan pose while shooting shooting hoops in their Spokane driveway. “After a minute or two, it was determined the masks definitely didn’t help with accuracy or add much fun to their game,” recalls Lonna Stowe.

Courtesy of Nancy Weber photo

Field work kicks up volcanic ash near Nancy and Mike Weber’s home in Ritzville.

Courtesy of Nancy Weber photo

A breeze stirs up volcanic ash in the fields near Nancy and Mike Weber’s home in Ritzville.

Courtesy of Tim Florin photo

Tim Florin and his roommates pose outside of our apartment May 20, 1980, while piles of ash had Spokane shut down.

Courtesy of Tim Florin photo

Tim Florin and his wife encountered a washed-out road to the Mount St. Helens visitor center in late summer 1980.

May 13, 2010 in City
Courtesy of Craig Numata photo

Courtesy Photo photo

Terry Flume, center, and Vicki Flume, not pictured, were married May 24, 1980, in Spokane. “Since they were unsure what the effects of the ash would be, officials recommended wearing masks… of course most people didn’t,” Vicki recalls.

Courtesy of Joyce Deitz photo

“The picture is of my husband Leroy, who had a great sense of humor and put the sign on our front gate on the South Hill,” writes Joyce Deitz, of Spokane.

Courtesy of Sam Richart photo

“Mount St. Helens blew one day before our first wedding anniversary. My wife said I didn’t have to do anything that big ever again for our anniversary. Staying indoors for a few days just added to the festivities,” writes Sam Richart.

Courtesy Photo photo

Spokane resident Ann Kaluza’s initially kept her children inside after the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. “Eventually we heard that it was okay to go outside if you wore a surgical mask,” she wrote in an email.

Courtesy of Betty Pontarolo photo

Betty Pontarolo, center, poses with her daughters Christie and Amy by their garage doors after her husband, Mike, hosed off the driveway May 18, 1980. Betty was eight months pregnant with her sone, Nick.

Courtesy of Betty Pontarolo photo

Mike Pontarolo hoses ash from his driveway on May 18, 2010.

Jan Schuerman photo

Nicholas Schuerman, 2, outside his Mead home in May 1980. “The kids were so desperate to play outside, so we relented, but with the infamous masks,” writes his mother, Jan Schuerman.

Courtesy of Jan Stoeser photo

Dennis Stoeser stands in the ash-covered street on May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Jan Stoeser photo

Jan Stoeser stands in her driveway May 18, 1980. “The ash was so heavy, it was almost impossible to move any distance. Removing it from the driveways and streets was a real challenge,” she writes.

Courtesy of Jan Stoeser photo

Ash covers Dennis and Jan Stoeser’s Mustang on May 18, 1980.

Courtesy Photo photo

Mary Farmer, of Spokane, holds up the Spokane Daily Chronicle from the day after Mount St. Helens erupted.

Courtesy of Julie Farmer photo

Julie Farmer’s backyard in north Spokane on May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Colleen Prophet photo

Jerry Prophet stands with a bucket of water he was taking to his pony, in the background, after the eruption of Mount St. Helens. “Although the pony had a shed where he could have saught shelter, he apparently stood outside all night and was covered with the ash,” writes his wife, Colleen Prophet.

Courtesy of Colleen Prophet photo

A boot print can be seen in the ash covering Colleen Prophet’s back porch after the eruption.

Courtesy Photo photo

Lorna Van Lankeren, second from left, and her husband, Evert, far left, operated the Mountain View Guest Ranch in Eureka, Mont., in 1980. This photo, taken after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, shows how ash obscured the ranch’s namesake view. Also pictured, from left, are Julius and Robert Stadler, of Pennsylvania; Lorna’s mother, Jessie Dunstan, from Australia; and Hilda Gerhard, from Canada.

Courtesy of Terry Kjolseth photo

The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, led to the cancellation of the Coeur d’Alene Marathon, which was to be held the following weekend.

Courtesy of Marilyn Fleenor photo

Howard Fleenor tries to clean up ash on his Latah Valley property May, 20 1980.

Courtesy of Marilyn Fleenor photo

Ash covers Marilyn Fleenor’s garden in Latah Valley on May 20, 1980.

Betty Ehr photo

A cloud of ash rolls over the Palouse in this photo taken at the rest area between Lewiston and Othello on May 18, 1980, taken by a friend of Betty Ehr, of Medical Lake.

Courtesy of Judy Morton photo

Clint Morton, 8, and Jill Morton clean volcanic ash of the deck of their home on the Palouse Highway.

Photo Kile photo

Pat Kile’s husband, Bert, attempted to go to work at The Spokesman-Review on Monday, May 19, 1980, but returned home from the bus stop 30 minutes later, covered in ash.

Courtesy of Gene Rosa photo

Gene Rosa, then a professor at Washington State University, shot this photo in Pullman after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy of Gene Rosa photo

A dark cloud of ash approaches Pullman on May 18, 1980.

Courtesy of Gene Rosa photo

Dust clouds the air in Pullman after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mount St. Helens at 8:32 a.m. on May 18, 1980 (first in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mt. St. Helens erupts May 18, 1980 (second in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mount St. Helens erupts (third in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mount St. Helens erupts (fourth in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mount St. Helens erupts (fifth in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

Mount St. Helens erupts (sixth in series of six).

Courtesy of Willard Pennell photo

A dog wears a painter’s mask in Farmington, Wash., after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy Photo photo

Ron Cauvel points to a tree showing the height mud flows reached after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. Cauvel, at the time a teacher in Cheney, was in the area as a member of the Army Reserve Corps of Engineers.

Ron Cauvel photo

These photos show the scope of destruction in the area around Toutle Lake after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Ron Cauvel photo

Mud flows destroyed trucks at the lumber mill in Toutle Lake after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Courtesy Photo photo

Celeste Frost’s husband washes volcano ash off their driveway in May 1980.

Barbara Greer photo

Barbar Greer Richards cleans off the family car at on West Dean Avenue after the eruption of Mount St. Helens.