November 30, 2010 in Business

Apples that don’t brown offered for U.S. market

Shannon Dininny Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

A worker sorts through apples at Crunch Pak, an apple slicing company in Cashmere, Wash. A Canadian biotechnology company has asked the U.S. to approve a genetically modified apple that doesn’t turn brown when sliced.
(Full-size photo)

CASHMERE, Wash. – A Canadian biotechnology company has asked the U.S. to approve a genetically modified apple that won’t brown soon after it’s sliced, saying the improvement could boost sales of apples for snacks, salads and other uses.

U.S. apple growers say it’s too soon to know whether they’d be interested in the apple: They need to resolve questions about the apple’s quality, the cost of planting and, most importantly, whether people would buy it.

“Genetically modified – that’s a bad word in our industry,” said Todd Fryhover, president of the apple commission in Washington state, which produces more than half the U.S. crop.

But Neal Carter, president of the company that developed the apples, said the technology would lower the cost of producing fresh slices, which have become a popular addition to children’s lunch boxes, and make apples more popular in salads and other quick meals.

Carter’s company, Okanagan Specialty Fruits of Summerland, B.C., licensed the nonbrowning technology from Australian researchers who pioneered it in potatoes. Essentially, the genes responsible for producing the enzyme that induces browning have been silenced in the apple variety being marketed as “Arctic.”

“They look like apple trees and grow like apple trees and produce apples that look like all other apples and when you cut them, they don’t turn brown,” Carter said. “The benefit is something that can be identified just about by everybody.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has considered about 100 petitions for genetically engineered or modified crops. Those that have drawn the most attention have been engineered to withstand certain weed killers, but among those the agency has approved are tomatoes altered to ripen more slowly – the first genetically modified crop approved in the U.S. in 1992 – and plums that resist a specific virus. This is the first petition for apples.

The USDA’s biotechnology regulations are designed to ensure that genetically modified crops are just as safe for agriculture and the environment as traditionally bred crop varieties, spokesman R. Andre Bell said in a statement. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service works with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, depending on the product, to ensure safety.

The approval process can take years, and it’s not clear the apples will be accepted even if they pass government inspection.

“Some people won’t like it just because of what it is,” Carter said. “In the end, it’s a great product, no question about it, and people will see the process used to get it had very sound science.”

Crunch Pak, based in Cashmere, is No. 1 in the sliced apple market, with customers including Costco, Kroger Co., Publix and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. The company, founded in 2000, has tripled in size in the past four years, with nearly 500 employees and a new processing plant in Pennsylvania.

Its apples are rinsed in a combination of calcium and ascorbic acid – vitamin C – to maintain freshness. Taste and quality are always important, but spokesman Tony Freytag said the biggest issue is food safety.

“Quite honestly, I would rather have an apple turn brown than think it’s still OK because it’s still white,” he said. “I’m not discounting the anti-browning. It’s just not the panacea.”

Everyone agreed that consumers will make the final call. They have largely accepted other genetically modified crops, but whether they will do the same with apples remains to be seen.

“There’s something about an apple. It’s the symbol of health and nutrition, and then to turn around and say it’s been genetically modified – doesn’t that go against what consumers say they’re looking for?” Fryhover asked. “Right now, I wouldn’t say the industry is poised to go either direction. We need to know more.”

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