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September 16, 2010
Jesse Tinsley photo

(from left) Esther Huetter, Betty Lynn Huetter, Paul Huetter and Henry Huetter, all descendents of John Theodore Huetter (in photo seen in upper left), look over family documents brought to Spokane by various family members at the opening of the historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Jean Huetter Bartholomew, left, talks with relatives Betty Lynn Huetter, right, and Mary Huetter McKee, center, while looking at a family photo of John Theodore Huetter, the patriarch of the Huetter family and Spokane area pioneer Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 at the newly refurbished Huetter Mansion at Gonzaga University. Descendents of John Huetter were asked to attend the open house that marked the building’s return to service after it was moved across a street and refurbished inside.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Dr. Thayne McCulloh, left, president of Gonzaga University, talks with Paul Huetter, center, and his cousin Henry Huetter, right, about the opening of the historic Huetter mansion at GU Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 as the new home of the alumni association. Although the mansion has been owned by Gonzaga for many years, the descendents of John Huetter were invited to open house at the mansion.

Jesse Tinsley photo

John Theodore Huetter was born in Germany, but brought his construction skills to Spokane, where he had a part in building many important buildings. On Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010, the historic house he built was opened to the public after it was moved and refurbished. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Bob Finn, left, of the GU Alumni Association, talks with Huetter family members (continuing left) Esther Huetter, Paul Huetter (seated) and Betty Lynn Huetter at the opening of the historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Inside the somewhat modernized interior of the historic Huetter Mansion, most of the space has been turned into offices, as seen Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Visitors could see photos of John Huetter, the builder of historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Visitors look at photos from the era of John Huetter, the builder of historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

In the attic-like third floor space, there is now a conference room in the historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

Bob Finn, left, of the GU Alumni Association, talks with Huetter family members and other visitors at the opening of the historic Huetter Mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 on the Gonzaga campus. The mansion, now owned by the university, has had many uses over the 100-plus years since it’s construction by John Huetter, a builder who built many large buildings, including Gonzaga’s administration building. The building will be the home of Gonzaga’s Alumni Association, but the university invited the many Huetter descendents to be present at Thursday’s open house. Huetter died in 1918 when he fell from a building.

Jesse Tinsley photo

The 19th century Huetter Mansion on the Gonzaga University campus now serves as the home of the alumni assocation. An open house held Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 and it was attended by many descendents of John Huetter.

Jesse Tinsley photo

A couple dozen descendents of John Huetter, the Spokane construction pioneer, stand on the porch of the recently moved and refurbished Huetter mansion Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 at Gonzaga University. The Huetter descendents were invited to the open house to see the home’s new location and look.