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April 1, 2011 in Outdoors
FILE The Spokesman-Review photo

A group of trumpeter swans in Winslow Pool in the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge on April 7, 1966. These birds were brought to the refuge as cygnets in a series of releases starting in 1963 and raised under controlled conditions as part of an endangered species reintroduction effort.

FILE The Spokesman-Review photo

The first trumpeter swans to hatch naturally at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge near Cheney are shown here with two adults in spring of 1967. The young trumpeters were possibly the most pampered members of the wildlife set in the Northwest at the time. The cygnets and a fourth not shown are the first of the then rare trumpeters ever hatched in captivity in Washington and possibly the first ever hatched in this state. All 35 adult trumpeters at the refuge at that time had been raised their from cygnet introductions. Apparently they all took a proprietary interest in the newly hatched cygnets. Biologists said it was difficult at times to tell which is the mother. A half dozen adults surrounded the cygnets when Chronicle photographer Wesley Cameron and assistant refuge manager Lowell Napier started after them on June 27, 1967, while the other Trumpeters tried to lure the men away or maneuvered to keep themselves between boat and the cygnets.

December 5, 2010 in Outdoors
Rajah Bose photo

A trumpeter swan called Solo has frequented Turnbull Refuge for at least three decades.

September 11, 2010 in Outdoors
Carlene Hardt photo

Trumpeter swan cygnets try their wings on Sept. 6, 2010 at Cheever Lake on Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge. It may have been the first time the young birds flew. The cygnets — five in all — are the offspring of a geriatric trumpeters nicknamed Solo and his mate. The young born in May of this year are Solo’s second brood in two years after being a mateless widower for 22 years.

January 27, 2010 in Outdoors
Rich Landers photo

The three 7-month-old cygnets tip bottoms up to feed on underwater vegetation as one of their parent trumpeter swans stays vigilant at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge. There’s no way to positively identify the adult as Solo or his female partner without handling the bird and bending back feathers to reveal its sex organs, refuge biologists say.

January 25, 2010 in City, Outdoors
Rich Landers photo

Solo, the trumpeter swan who’s been returning to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for at least three and possibly four decades, arrived at Winslow Pool on Jan. 25, 2010, as soon as enough open water was free of ice for him to come back. This time he returned with the mate he found in 2009 and three of the four cygnets they produced that spring. Refuge biologists do not know where the swans spent the ice-up portion of the winter.

Rich Landers photo

Solo, the trumpeter swan who’s been returning to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for at least three and possibly four decades, is photographed at Winslow Pool on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, with his mate and three of the four cygnets they produced in 2009.

Rich Landers photo

A family of trumpeter swans leave Winslow Pool at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge after returning Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, as soon as enough open water was free of ice.

Rich Landers photo

A young trumpeter swan stretches its wings a minute or two before the swan family took off from Winslow Pool at Turnbull National Wildlife Reuge on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010. Also pictured is another of the three cygnets on the pond plus their parents, one of which is Solo, the trumpeter swan who’s been returning to Turnbull for at least three and possibly four decades.

Rich Landers photo

Solo the trumpeter swan that’s been returning to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for at least three and possibly four decades, takes off from Winslow Pool after returning to the refuge on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010.

Rich Landers photo

Solo, the trumpeter swan who’s been returning to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for at least three and possibly four decades, is photographed at Winslow Pool on Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, with his mate and three of the four cygnets they produced in 2009.

December 27, 2009 in Outdoors
Christopher Anderson photo

A trumpeter swan nicknamed Solo swims with his mate and their brood of four cygnets at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge in June 2009. Two decades after his first mate was killed, the refuge’s oldest known critter finally found a viable female and sired a family. They repeated in 2010 by producing five cygnets.

April 16, 2006
File photo

A male trumpeter swan – we’re calling him Solo – has returned to Turnbull, where he favors Cheever Lake.