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‘Take me fishing’ trailer aimed at kids

Idaho Fish and Game will be wheeling out “Take Me Fishing Trailers” packed with fishing rods and tackle for Idaho Panhandle kids to use free at trout-stocked ponds in June.

The “Take Me Fishing” trailer debuts this season on June 2, from 4 p.m.-7 p.m. at Fernan Lake and then on June 4 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at Post Falls Park. 

Fishing equipment can be checked out for free on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are not needed.  Participants who register will be granted a permit to fish without a license.  If they get hooked on fishing after the event, parents will have to purchase a license. 

However, Idaho children under the age of 14 can fish for free.

Stocked with basic fishing equipment and information, the trailer wrapped with eye-catching fish illustrations is hard to miss.  The fishing trailer parks near waters that are stocked with fish.

Other dates and locations for Fishing Trailer stops include:

June 9: Round Lake, 4 p.m.-7 p.m.

June 11: (Free Fishing Day in Idaho) Rathdrum City Park. Time TBA.

June 14: Hauser Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

June 16: Kelso Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

June 21: Robinson Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

June 23: Jewel Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

June 28: Shepherd Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

June 30: Perkins Lake, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.


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