December 26, 2011 in Sports

Many players say they would try to hide concussions

Howard Fendrich Associated Press
 

Ask Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew whether he would try to play through a concussion or yank himself from a game, and he’ll provide a straightforward answer.

“Hide it,” the NFL’s leading rusher said.

“The bottom line is: You have to be able to put food on the table. No one’s going to sign or want a guy who can’t stay healthy. I know there will be a day when I’m going to have trouble walking. I realize that,” Jones-Drew said. “But this is what I signed up for. Injuries are part of the game. If you don’t want to get hit, then you shouldn’t be playing.”

Other players say they would do the same: Hide it.

In a series of interviews about head injuries with the AP over the last two weeks, 23 of 44 NFL players – slightly more than half – said they would try to conceal a possible concussion rather than pull themselves out of a game. Some acknowledged they already have. Players also said they should be better protected from their own instincts: More than two-thirds of the group talked to wants independent neurologists on sidelines during games.

The AP spoke to a cross-section of players – at least one from each of the 32 NFL teams – to gauge whether concussion safety and attitudes about head injuries have changed in the past two years of close attention devoted to the issue. The group included 33 starters and 11 reserves; 25 players on offense and 19 on defense; all have played at least three seasons in the NFL.

The players tended to indicate they are more aware of the possible long-term effects of jarring hits to their heads. In a sign of the sort of progress the league wants, five players said that while they would have tried to conceal a concussion during a game in 2009, now they would seek help.

“You look at some of the cases where you see some of the retired players and the issues that they’re having now, even with some of the guys who’ve passed and had their brains examined – you see what their brains look like now,” said Redskins linebacker London Fletcher. “That does play a part in how I think now about it.”

But his teammate, backup fullback Mike Sellers, said he’s hidden concussions in the past and would “highly doubt” that any player would willingly take himself out.

“You want to continue to play. You’re a competitor. You’re not going to tell on yourself. There have been times I’ve been dinged, and they’ve taken my helmet from me, and … I’d snatch my helmet back and get back on the field,” Sellers said. “A lot of guys wouldn’t say anything because a lot of guys wouldn’t think anything during the game, until afterward, when they have a headache or they can’t remember things.”

A few players said they’d be particularly inclined to hide a concussion if it happened in a playoff game or the Super Bowl. Some said their decision would depend on the severity of a head injury — but they’d hide it if they could.

© Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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