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February 10, 2011 in Nation/World
Amr Nabil photo

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak listens during a meeting with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Saltanov, at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. The boldest challenge ever to President Hosni Mubarak’s three decades of authoritarian rule has so far failed in its singular goal to oust him immediately. And after initial euphoria over their defiance of a state once thought impregnable, protesters are increasingly uneasy that Mubarak or leaders he has chosen may manage to hang on to power. Egyptian foreign minister Ahmed Aboul Gheit, at foreground.

Mohammed Zaid photo

An Egyptian lawyer shouts anti-Mubarak slogans as lawyers streamed into Cairo’s Tahrir Square, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt’s wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. The poster written in Arabic reads, “Before you leave we want the 70 billion dollars.”

Nile Tv Via Aptn photo

Egypt’s Defense Minister Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi attends a meeting of the military supreme council in this image taken from TV Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak will meet the demands of protesters, military and ruling party, officials said Thursday in the strongest indication yet that Egypt’s longtime president may be about to give up power and that the armed forces were seizing control. The military’s supreme council was meeting Thursday, without the commander in chief Mubarak, and announced on state TV its “support of the legitimate demands of the people.”

Ben Curtis photo

Cheering protesters react as high-ranking Egyptian Army Gen. Hassan El-Rueni, unseen, addresses the continuing anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb 10, 2011.

Associated Press photo

Egyptian protesters, who claim delays for their requests for housing, start a fire in front of local government headquarters Port Said Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt’s wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law.

Associated Press photo

Egyptian protesters, who claim delays for their requests to get housing , set fire on motorbikes and vehicles outside the local government headquarters, in Port Said Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt’s wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law.

Mohammed Zaid photo

Egyptian lawyers in black robes, at right, are stopped by anti-riot police officers, left, as they stream into Cairo’s Tahrir Square, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt’s wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law.

Ben Curtis photo

Egyptian protesters pray in front of a tank in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

A flag is waved by anti-government protesters as they demonstrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won’t be tolerated much longer.

Emilio Morenatti photo

An Egyptian soldier watches as protesters pray in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won’t be tolerated much longer.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won’t be tolerated much longer.

Emilio Morenatti photo

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of “We’re almost there, we’re almost there” and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Hasan Jamali photo

British Foreign Secretary William Hague, left, takes questions Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011, during a press conference in Manama, Bahrain, with Bahraini Foreign Minister Sheik Khaled Al Khalifa, right. The two men addressed the situation in Egypt and other Mideast issues.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of “We’re almost there, we’re almost there” and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Ben Curtis photo

Egyptian protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television Thursday it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met.

Amr Nabil photo

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of ‘We’re almost there, we’re almost there’ and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of “We’re almost there, we’re almost there” and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Emilio Morenatti photo

Anti-government protesters react as Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak makes a televised statement to his nation in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is handing his powers over to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, and ordered constitutional amendments Thursday. But the move means he retains his title of president and ensures regime control over the reform process, falling short of protester demands. Protesters in Cairo’s central Tahrir Square, hoping he would announce his resignation outright, reacted in fury and disbelief.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters react to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s televised statement to his nation in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is handing his powers over to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, and ordered constitutional amendments Thursday. But the move means he retains his title of president and ensures regime control over the reform process, falling short of protester demands. Protesters in Cairo’s central Tahrir Square, hoping he would announce his resignation outright, reacted in fury and disbelief.

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters hold their shoes as they react to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s televised statement to his nation in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is handing his powers over to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, and ordered constitutional amendments Thursday. But the move means he retains his title of president and ensures regime control over the reform process, falling short of protester demands. Protesters in Cairo’s central Tahrir Square, hoping he would announce his resignation outright, reacted in fury and disbelief.

Ben Curtis photo

EDS NOTE: RECROP OF XBC108 A protester is overcome by emotion as he and others prematurely celebrate prior to the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in which they believed he would step down, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, “Leave, leave, leave.”

Tara Todras-whitehill photo

Anti-government protesters react with anger and sadness to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s televised statement to his nation in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is handing his powers over to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, and ordered constitutional amendments Thursday. But the move means he retains his title of president and ensures regime control over the reform process, falling short of protester demands. Protesters in Cairo’s central Tahrir Square, hoping he would announce his resignation outright, reacted in fury and disbelief.

Ben Curtis photo

Protesters wave their shoes in the air in contempt as they watch a projection of the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, “Leave, leave, leave.”