February 13, 2011 in Features

Book Notes: ‘Radioman’ dedication to take place Feb. 25

By The Spokesman-Review
 

Here’s a local development that illustrates the power of a book: On Dec. 22, the tower at Spokane International Airport was officially named the Ray Daves Air Traffic Control Tower.

And it all came about because of the 2008 book “Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific” (Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press) by Carol Edgemon Hipperson, a Spokane author.

“Radioman” is about Daves, a local Pearl Harbor survivor. His story resonated with the air traffic controllers at the airport, who started a drive to name the tower after their fellow radioman.

It wasn’t easy. In fact, it took an act of Congress.

The U.S. House of Representatives and Senate came on board. On Dec. 22, President Barack Obama signed a bill officially naming the tower after Daves.

And on Feb. 25, Daves and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, who sponsored the legislation, will be at the tower for a dedication ceremony.

“It’s about the power of a book,” said Hipperson. “You could even refer to it as a ‘concrete example.’ ”

Let ‘Grandpa’ read to you

Spokane’s Community Minded Television (channel 14 on Comcast cable) has launched a new show that’s all about reading: “Grandpa Read’s Quiet Time Tales.”

Grandpa Read – actually a Spokane actor named Gary Sturm – reads classic children’s stories and fairy tales aloud, with accompanying original illustrations.

The L.A. company that produces them says they are in the spirit of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” and “Reading Rainbow.”

The show airs Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2:30 p.m.

Spokane is the first market to air the series. It is also available on DVD through www.quiettime.com.

‘Northwest Drylands – Seasons’

A new coffee table-style book focusing on Eastern Washington is now available.

“Northwest Drylands – Seasons” (John Clement Gallery), with photos by John Clement and text by Richard Scheuerman, includes 100 images of the vast area between the Cascades and the Idaho foothills.

Clement is a well-known photographer from the Tri-Cities whose previous book was “Palouse Country: A Land and Its People.”


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