February 20, 2011 in Outdoors

Field reports: Wolverines, wolves, trout

 
More on this topic

Background and the latest updates

Map of this story's location

WILDLIFE – Researchers studying wolverines in the North Cascades have new hopes pinned on their latest catch – Mattie.

The young female may be pregnant, and if she is, she could lead them to the first verified wolverine den in the North Cascades, said Keith Aubry, wildlife biologist and study leader for the Pacific Northwest Research Station.

The wolverine was live-trapped, radio-collared and released this month at Harts Pass near Mazama.

Mattie is the seventh animal in this study to be collared, and the eighth individual identified.

Last year, Canadians recaptured Rocky and Melanie, wolverines trapped at Harts Pass. Twisp-area biologists caught Eowyn, who left the area for an epic journey that took her near Kamloops, B.C., then west across the Fraser River.

In May, she was found dead in southwestern British Columbia after traveling more than 300 air miles. Researchers found her carcass near a deer carcass. Her skull had been crushed. Cougar scat was found at the site.

Wenatchee World

$10K reward offered for wolf poacher

OUTCRY – Conservation groups have posted a billboard near La Grande, Ore., showing a dead wolf in hopes of jailing the person who killed it.

The U.S. Highway 82 sign advertises a $10,000 reward for information in the September shooting of a 2-year-old male wolf from the Wenaha pack in northeastern Oregon. It was wearing a radio collar monitored by Oregon and Washington biologists to study its movements along the state line.

Guide offers tip for Rufus rainbows

FISHING – Anton Jones of Darrell & Dad’s Family Guide Service has a tip for anglers casting bait rigs for rainbow trout near the commercial net pens at Lake Rufus Woods.

Even though the free fish are feeding largely on the feed pellets that drift through the nets full of captive, farmed rainbows, there’s little sense in trying to “match the hatch” of “gazillions of pellets.”

“We fish where they are with a bait that is in the area they are eating, and only a bit bigger than what they are feeding on.  However, we use rainbow color and glitter to attract their attention.” 

Rich Landers

Dogs harassing wintering deer

WILDLIFE – Washington Fish and Wildlife Department agents in the Spokane Region have spent an unusually large amount of time this winter responding to complaints about free-roaming dogs harassing deer.

Rich Landers


Thoughts and opinions on this story? Click here to comment >>

Get stories like this in a free daily email