February 21, 2011 in City

Jim Kershner’s This day in history

By The Spokesman-Review
 

From our archives, 100 years ago

Male political candidates were a little nervous about answering a questionnaire from the Women’s Nonpartisan Political League in Spokane.

Here were the first six questions:

• Were you a supporter of woman suffrage?

• If elected, would you maintain matrons in the city jail and women protective police officers, women probation officers and municipal homes for men and women?

• Are you in favor of abolishing the third degree and obtaining confessions from prisoners?

• What are your views on the social evil (a euphemism for prostitution)? Would you favor a restricted district?

• Are you in favor of closing the saloons from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m.? … Are you in favor of the reduction of the number of saloons? Would you compel all bars to be visible from the street?

• Would you be strictly in favor of enforcing the law against gambling?

Evidently, a number of candidates for the new city commission were hesitant to “announce themselves publicly” on these questions. Yet if they didn’t, they risked not getting the support of this newly powerful constituency.

Also on this date

(From the Associated Press)

1911: Composer Gustav Mahler, despite a fever, conducted the New York Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall in what turned out to be his final concert (he died the following May).


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