July 7, 2011
J. Rayniak photo

Children and adults used drum sticks and rattles and played the “pumin,” (the Salish word for drum) at the Fairfield Library, Thurs., June 23, 2011. La Rae Wiley, a member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, shared the Salish language and it’s traditional songs and stories with them. She travels throughout the Inland Northwest educating people of the languages of the Plateau and the Salish community’s effort to reclaim it’s language. She is a member of the Colville Confederated Tribe, the executive director of the Salish School of Spokane, and one a few speakers of the language. J.

J. Rayniak photo

La Rae Wiley sings and beats “Quail Dancing on a Rail” on her “pumin” (drum) as children and adults join in at the Fairfield (Wa.) library, Thurs., June 23, 2011. She shared traditional songs and stories, and introduced some of the words of the language. She travels throughout the Inland Northwest educating people of the languages of the Plateau and the Salish community’s effort to reclaim it’s language. She is a member of the Collville Confederated Tribe, the executive director of the Salish School of Spokane, and one a few speakers of the language. J.

J. Rayniak photo

La Rae Wiley sings and beats the “Horse Song” on her “pumin” (drum) to children and adults at the Fairfield (Wa.) library, Thurs., June 23, 2011. She is a member of the Collville Confederated Tribe, the executive director of the Salish School of Spokane, and one a few speakers of the language. She travels throughout the Inland Northwest educating people of the languages of the Plateau and the Salish community’s effort to reclaim it’s language. J.