Local news

Swiping success

PARMA, Ohio – The Girl Scouts were selling their cookies the old-fashioned way, pulling a creaky-wheeled red wagon laden with Thin Mints and Samoas down a suburban street. But the affair took a decidedly 21st-century twist when, with a polite smile, one of the girls pulled out a smartphone and inquired: “Would you like to pay with a credit card?”

The girls are among about 200 troops in northeast Ohio who are changing the way Girl Scouts do business. For the first time, the girls are accepting credit cards using a device called GoPayment, a free credit card reader that clips onto smartphones. Girl Scout leaders hope that allowing customers to pay with plastic will drive up cookie sales in a world where carrying cash is rapidly going the way of dial-up Internet. Keeping pace with changing technology is a priority lately for the historic Girl Scouts, an organization that’s preparing to celebrate its 100th anniversary next year.

“Normally I think a lot of customers would love to buy cookies, but they have to walk by the booth because they’re not carrying cash,” said Marianne Love, director of business services for the Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio. “I know I never carry cash when I’m out shopping.”

Ten troops in San Diego are also testing out the device this month.

“I know there’s a lot of interest across the country with other Girl Scout councils,” Love said. “So I wouldn’t be surprised if you see it everywhere this time next year.”

GoPayment is just one of several popular mobile payment devices that took off in 2010, with hundreds of thousands of people signing up to use them, said Todd Ablowitz, president of Double Diamond Group of Centennial, Colo., a consulting company focused on the mobile payment industry.

“Everyone from delivery drivers to Girl Scouts to baby sitters are swiping cards on their phones to take a payment,” Ablowitz said. “I mean, this barely existed before 2010. The numbers are staggering.”

The technology has actually existed for years, but it wasn’t until San Francisco-based Square Inc. began offering its card readers for free that the industry really gained momentum, Ablowitz said.

Intuit, the Mountain View, Calif.-based company that manufactures GoPayment, charges a small fee per transaction and offers various pricing plans to customers based on sale volume. GoPayment has been on the market for about two years. Intuit charges the Girl Scouts its lowest rate, at 1.7 percent plus 15 cents per transaction. Most customers pay 2.7 percent per transaction.

“We saw people that wanted to take electronic payments and just didn’t have a way to do it,” said Chris Hylen, vice president of Intuit’s payments business. “It’s been the fastest-growing part of our business.”

Sales are already picking up in Ohio, with one troop reporting selling 20 percent more than they did in the same location the previous year, Love said.

“And we also had a customer earlier today say he was taking out cash to buy two boxes, and he ended up buying seven because he was able to use his credit card,” she said.



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