November 26, 2011 in Business

Bing hitches hopes to Rudolph

Search engine fight gets animated
Michael Liedtke Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Microsoft’s Aaron Lilly, left, and Sean Carver pose with figures from the animated show “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” at the Microsoft office in San Francisco.
(Full-size photo)

SAN FRANCISCO – Like Santa Claus on that one foggy Christmas Eve, Microsoft has summoned Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to guide some precious cargo – a holiday marketing campaign for its Bing search engine.

The advertisements, debuting online and on TV this week, star Rudolph and other characters from the animated story about the most famous reindeer of all. The campaign is part of Microsoft’s attempt to trip up Google Inc., an Internet search rival as imposing as the Abominable Snowman was before Yukon Cornelius tamed the monster.

Google has been countering with its own emotional ads throughout the year. Most of Google’s ads show snippets of its dominant search engine and other products at work before swirling into the logo of the company’s Chrome Web browser.

The dueling ads underscore the lucrative nature of search engines. Although visitors pay nothing to use them, search engines generate billions of dollars a year in revenue from ads posted alongside the search results.

The holiday season is a particularly opportune time for search companies because that’s when people do more searches. That means more people to show ads to. Advertisers also tend to be willing to pay more per ad because they know people are in a buying mode.

To capture that audience, Microsoft and Google are both thinking outside the search box to promote their brands.

Although the text ads running alongside search results do a fine job of reeling in some customers, they still lack the broader, more visceral impact of a well-done television commercial, said Peter Daboll, chief executive of Ace Metrix, a firm that rates the effectiveness of ads.

“It’s instructive that these companies who are all about the Internet and doing things in real time are actually doing these emotive ads on TV,” Daboll said.

Search engines are particularly difficult to sell because the sophisticated technology required to make them work isn’t something “you can touch or feel in a store, so you need to bring some emotion to it,” said Sean Carver, Bing’s advertising director. “The storytelling is important.”

Microsoft Corp. licensed the rights to the characters from Rudolph’s 47-year-old holiday special after convincing their owners that the Bing commercials would add an endearing chapter to the reindeer’s story. The rights to Rudolph and the rest of the cast are owned by the children of Robert L. May, who wrote the story in 1939 while working as a copywriter at the Montgomery Ward department store (May’s brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, later wrote the famous song).

There’s no mistaking the common theme in the four Rudolph ads produced for the Bing promotion. The ads are all done in the same stop-motion puppet animation used in the original 1964 TV special. One features Bumble the Abominable Snowman using Bing to get ideas for a more fearsome roar.

Microsoft has bought seven slots on national TV to run those four 30-second ads. The company is going for high impact rather than high frequency and is placing those ads during holiday-themed specials.

© Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Thoughts and opinions on this story? Click here to comment >>

Get stories like this in a free daily email