October 16, 2011 in Sports

Wheldon dies in fiery crash

Associated Press
 
Jessica Ebelhar photo

Drivers Dan Wheldon, front, and Will Power crash during a wreck that involved 15 cars during the IndyCar Series’ auto race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011. Wheldon died following the crash.
(Full-size photo)(All photos)

LAS VEGAS – Dan Wheldon, who moved to the United States from his native England with hopes of winning the Indianapolis 500 and went on to prevail at his sport’s most famed race twice, died Sunday after a massive, fiery wreck at the Las Vegas Indy 300.

He was 33.

Wheldon, who won the Indy 500 for the second time this May, won 16 times in his IndyCar career and was the series champion in 2005. He was airlifted from the Las Vegas track at 1:19 p.m. local time and taken to a nearby hospital, becoming the first IndyCar driver to die on the track since rookie Paul Dana was killed in practice on the morning of race day at Homestead-Miami Speedway in 2006.

As word began to spread that his injuries were fatal, those at the track could not control their tears. Television cameras captured Ashley Judd, the wife of IndyCar champion Dario Franchitti, dabbing at her eyes shortly before the official word came.

The remainder of the race was canceled. Drivers solemnly returned to the track for a five-lap tribute to Wheldon, almost all of them hiding their eyes behind dark sunglasses after being told their colleague was gone. As Roger Penske met with his team trackside and other drivers simply hugged those around them, IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard made the announcement of Wheldon’s death.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with his family today,” Bernard said.

When drivers returned to the track, Wheldon’s No. 77 was the only one on the towering scoreboard. Franchitti sobbed uncontrollably as he got back into his car for the tribute laps. Over speakers at the track, the song “Danny Boy” blared, followed by “Amazing Grace” as hundreds of crew workers from each team stood solemnly.

The race was only minutes old when Wheldon, who started at the back of the 34-car field and was in position for a $5 million payday if he could have won the race, was one of 15 cars involved in a wreck that started when two cars touched tires.

Several cars burst into flames, and debris was all over the track, some of the impact so intense that workers needed to patch holes in the asphalt.

Video replays showed Wheldon’s car turning over as it went airborne and sailed into what’s called the “catch fence,” which sits over the SAFER barrier that’s designed to give a bit when cars make contact. Rescue workers were at Wheldon’s car quickly, some furiously waving for more help to get to the scene. Bernard said Wheldon’s injuries were “unsurvivable.”

Wheldon’s first Indianapolis 500 victory was in 2005 – he passed Danica Patrick with less than 10 laps to go that year – and his win at the sport’s most famed race this year was one to particularly savor.

It came in perhaps the oddest of fashions, as he was the beneficiary of a huge gaffe by someone else.

Wheldon was in second place, far back of rookie J.R. Hildebrand approaching the final turn – when Hildebrand lost control and clipped the wall. Wheldon zipped past, and the only lap he led all day at Indianapolis was the last one. He returned to the track the next morning for the traditional photo session with the winner, kissing the bricks as his 2-year-old son Sebastian sat on the asphalt alongside him, and wife, Susie, held their then-2-month-old, Oliver.

Wheldon was almost resigned to finishing second at Indy for the third straight year, before misfortune struck Hildebrand.

“It’s obviously unfortunate, but that’s Indianapolis,” Wheldon said. “That’s why it’s the greatest spectacle in racing. You never know what’s going to happen.”

Such was the case again Sunday.

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