September 14, 2011 in Nation/World

Poverty rate rose in weak economy

Joblessness blamed for dire numbers
Don Lee, Noam Levey, Alejandro Lazo Tribune Washington bureau
 
Income dropping

Inflation-adjusted median household income – the middle of the populace – fell 2.3 percent to $49,445 last year from a year ago and 7 percent from 2000.

Fast figures

46.2 million: Americans living in poverty
49.9 million: Americans without healthy coverage
22: Percentage of U.S. children in poverty
22.7: Percentage of poverty in Mississippi, the highest among states
6.6: Percentage of poverty in New Hampshire, the lowest among states

Poverty threshold

By the Census Bureau’s latest measure, the poverty threshold last year was an income of $11,139 for one person and $22,314 for a family of four.

WASHINGTON – In a grim portrait of a nation in economic turmoil, the government reported that the number of people living in poverty last year surged to 46.2 million – the most in at least half a century – as 1 million more Americans went without health insurance and household incomes fell sharply.

The poverty rate for all Americans rose in 2010 for the third consecutive year, matching the 15.1 percent figure in 1993 and pushing many more young adults to double up or return to their parents’ home to avoid joining the ranks of the poor.

Taken together, the annual income and poverty snapshot released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau underscored how the recession is casting a long shadow well after its official end in June 2009.

And at the current sluggish pace of economic growth, analysts don’t expect many of these indicators of economic and social well-being to turn better soon.

Census officials wouldn’t say definitively what caused the surge in poverty, but it was evident that the root of the continuing misery was the nation’s inability to create jobs. The total of Americans who fell below the official poverty line last year rose from 43.6 million in 2009. Of the 2.6 million increase, about two-thirds of the people said they did not work even one week last year.

Those with jobs were much less likely to be poor, but the recession and weak recovery have wiped out income gains of prior years for a broad spectrum of workers and their families. Inflation-adjusted median household income – the middle of the populace – fell 2.3 percent to $49,445 last year from a year ago and 7 percent from 2000.

“It’s a lost decade for the middle class,” said Sheldon Danziger, a poverty expert at the University of Michigan.

The number of poor children younger than 18 reached its highest number since 1962, said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution.

Poverty reached a record high for Latino children, who Frey said accounted for more than half the overall increase in poor children last year. Blacks had the highest child poverty rate at 39 percent, up more than 3 points from last year.

Overall, poverty was generally higher than the national rate in states with high unemployment and in the South. Mississippi had the highest poverty rate last year, at 22.7 percent, and New Hampshire had the lowest, 6.6 percent.

The number of 25- to 34-year-old men and women who were living with their parents last spring totaled 5.9 million – a 25.5 percent increase since the recession began in 2007. Nearly half of this group would have been counted as among the poor had they been out on their own, according to Trudi Renwick, chief of poverty statistics for the Census Bureau.

“The next generation is going to be terribly punished if we don’t find more jobs,” said Timothy M. Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin. Studies have shown the effects of recessions and job losses can hurt a worker’s earnings for many years into the future.

The census report, coming shortly after President Barack Obama unveiled a proposed $447 billion package of tax cuts and spending to revive job growth and the recovery, was seen as intensifying the debate over the government’s role in helping the poor and unemployed at a time of budget deficits and painful cutbacks in public services.

Unemployment benefits, the Census Bureau said, helped lift about 3 million people above the poverty line, and Obama’s latest proposal includes continuing the aid.

The report “underscores yet again why these programs must be maintained to rebuild the economy,” said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project, referring to unemployment insurance and Social Security benefits.

But conservative groups expressed their concerns about Americans’ growing reliance on such programs, including government health insurance.

“It raises the issue of whether we can afford this,” said Nina Owcharenko, director of health policy studies at the Heritage Foundation. “These entitlement programs are unsustainable.”

The census report found more Americans again lost health insurance in 2010, continuing a decade-long erosion in coverage that pushed the percentage of uninsured to 16.3 percent, the highest ever recorded. But the decline in health coverage slowed between 2009 and 2010 and was not statistically significant, according to census analysts.

The number of young people between 18 and 24 who had insurance increased significantly, possibly reflecting the effect of the new health care law, which allows dependents up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plans.

The decline in insurance coverage was fueled largely by employers dropping health benefits as health care costs continued to rise, a trend that has reduced the percentage of Americans who get health benefits through work from a peak of 65.1 percent in 2000 to 55.3 percent last year.


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