August 14, 2012 in Nation/World

In brief: Shootout in Texas leaves three dead

From Wire Reports
 

COLLEGE STATION, Texas – A deadly shootout erupted Monday near the Texas A&M University campus when a man being brought an eviction notice opened fire on a Texas law enforcement officer, leaving three people dead, including the officer and the gunman.

Police say Thomas Alton Caffall, 35, opened fire on Brazos County Constable Brian Bachmann just after noon as the lawman brought an eviction notice. Both men were later pronounced dead at a hospital.

Police identified Chris Northcliff, 43, as the third person killed in the shootings at an off-campus home not far from the university’s football stadium. Three other law enforcement officers and a 55-year-old woman were wounded, College Station Assistant Police Chief Scott McCollum said.

Officers responding Monday afternoon to reports of an officer down saw Bachmann wounded on the ground in the front yard, then got into what McCollum described as an extended shootout with Caffall, who eventually was shot.

Police spokeswoman Rhonda Seaton said Northcliff was outside the home when he was shot, as was the wounded woman, whose name had not been released.

The woman was hospitalized in serious condition. One of the injured officers, Justin Oehlkee, was treated for a gunshot wound in the calf and was in stable condition, Seaton said. Two other officers – Brad Smith and Phil Dorsett, were treated for “shrapnel injuries” and released, Seaton said.

Jackson treated for bipolar disorder

CHICAGO – U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., a Chicago Democrat who took a hushed medical leave two months ago, is being treated for bipolar disorder, the Mayo Clinic announced Monday.

The Rochester, Minn.-based clinic specified his condition as Bipolar II, which is defined as periodic episodes of depression and hypomania, a less-serious form of mania. “Congressman Jackson is responding well to the treatment and regaining his strength,” the clinic said in a statement.

Bipolar II is a treatable condition that affects parts of the brain controlling emotion, thought and drive and is likely caused “by a complex set of genetic and environmental factors,” the clinic said.

A Jackson aide said last week that the congressman was expected back in the district within a matter of weeks, but Jackson’s spokesmen declined to comment Monday.


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