August 15, 2012 in Sports

Ferguson: McIlroy lines up as Woods’ biggest challenge

Doug Ferguson Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Rory McIlroy turned the PGA Championship into his playground by topping the field by eight strokes.
(Full-size photo)

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. – The next major is eight months away. The next showdown is nine days away.

Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy are assured of being paired together next week at The Barclays for the start of the FedEx Cup playoffs. And while these playoff events are more about making money than making history, this could become meaningful down the road. Woods has never faced a rival with this kind of potential. He has never won at least three times in a year without being looked upon as the best player in golf.

For the first time in his quest to break Jack Nicklaus’ record in the majors, the biggest challenge for Woods is no longer overcoming a failed marriage, four knee surgeries, a tender Achilles tendon or even the fact that he’s simply getting older.

It’s another player.

McIlroy and Woods have played in the same tournament 12 times this year. McIlroy has finished ahead of Woods seven times, including wins at the Honda Classic and the PGA Championship. They both tied for 40th at the Masters.

This is not about where they were at a similar stage in their careers. Woods is incomparable in that regard. McIlroy has won twice in his first 16 majors as a pro. Woods won five majors in that span, including the career Grand Slam at age 24.

It’s about where they are now. So dominant was McIlroy at Kiawah Island, where he had rounds of 67-66 on the weekend to win the PGA Championship by eight shots, that it’s easy to get caught up in all things Rory.

McIlroy has won two majors by a combined 16 shots.

To put that in perspective, only five majors have been won by eight shots or more in the last 35 years – three by Woods, two by McIlroy.

McIlroy could turn out to be like Johnny Miller, a comet on the golf horizon in the 1970s when he fired at flags and slaughtered the competition. Miller won two majors, with a 63 on the last day at Oakmont and a 66 in the final round at Royal Birkdale.

Perhaps McIlroy will be like Tom Watson, who was 10 years younger than Nicklaus.

Nicklaus already had the record for most majors when Watson won his first one, although Watson kept him from winning more. He beat Nicklaus twice in 1977, in the Masters and in the “Duel in the Sun” at Turnberry. He beat him again in 1981 at Augusta National and kept him from a record five U.S. Open titles in 1982 at Pebble Beach when Watson chipped in for birdie on the 17th hole.

McIlroy is 13 years younger than Woods. They have never gone head-to-head on Sunday in a major. Ultimately, that will be the measure.

There is no reason for McIlroy to be intimidated. His name on the leaderboard means just as much. He is a favorite in any color shirt.

It was never going to be easy for Woods to break Nicklaus’ record of 18 majors. He said even in good times that Nicklaus achieved that mark over 25 seasons.

In handicapping Woods’ chances of breaking the record, one popular analogy was that he would have to match Phil Mickelson’s career wins in the majors (four) just to tie the record. This never made much sense, though, because Woods and Mickelson never belonged in the same conversation when the topic was majors. Mickelson went 42 majors before he won his first. Woods had won 12 of them in the same span. They’re not the same player, then or now.

The main problem for Woods has been his head. His game is in great shape, and he knows it. He is pressing to win a major, to resume his pursuit of Nicklaus and shut up the critics. But this is the wrong game to try too hard. Maybe that’s one lesson to take away from Kiawah.

The bigger problem could turn out to be McIlroy.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus