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August 28, 2012
Gerald Herbert photo

Jennifer Jones, a Grand Marshal for various bands and events, poses for a photo in the Treme section of New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

An abandoned part of the old Lafitte housing projects, right, is seen near new public assisted housing that replaces it, with the downtown skyline in background in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

A woman walks past new public assisted housing where the Lafitte housing projects once stood, with the elevated Interstate 10 on Claiborne Ave. in the foreground in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

A passing child reacts to Jennifer Jones, a Grand Marshal for various New Orleans bands and events, as she poses for a photo in the Treme section of New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

A woman sits on a stoop on St. Ann St. in the Treme section of New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

A girl rides a bike past a blighted building on N. Miro St. in the Treme section of New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

Children run in a courtyard of the Iberville housing projects, slated to be torn down, in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

Johnny Anderson, 12, plays basketball in the Iberville housing projects, which are slated to be torn down, in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

Shirley M. Moeeisa, left, and Chantel Young, look at a magazine on a balcony in the Iberville housing projects, which are slated to be torn down, in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

A printed painting of the Virgin Mary and a prayer card for the beatification of New Orleans native Mother Henriette Deslille are seen taped in a window in the Iberville housing project, slated to be torn down, in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.

Gerald Herbert photo

San Mateo, Calif. tourists Kelly Hua, left, hugs Joy Lopez as they pose for a photo by their friend Charlie Resngit at Willie Mae’s Restaurant, a traditional soul food eatery in the Treme section of New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012. The face of New Orleans is changing: Seven years after Hurricane Katrina the city many said would not recover is racially more diverse, and whiter, younger and richer; indicators not of failure but its success at reinventing itself. In fact, the city is experiencing a boom, and even gentrifying.