August 29, 2012
Julio Cortez photo

In this portrait taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, Germaine Maurer, left, and her son Jared Maurer, 28, pose for the Associated Press in their home in Piscataway, N.J. Germaine Maurer’s other son, Ben Maurer, went missing when he was 17 in 2002. He was identified through advanced DNA technology and new federal funding through a program aimed at identifying bodies at New York’s Hart Island, better known as potter’s field. Already the project has identified about 50 of the 54 bodies that have been disinterred.

Julio Cortez photo

In this portrait taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, Germaine Maurer, left, and her son Jared Maurer, 28, pose for the Associated Press in their home in Piscataway, N.J. Germaine Maurer’s other son, Ben Maurer, went missing when he was 17 in 2002. He was identified through advanced DNA technology and new federal funding through a program aimed at identifying bodies at New York’s Hart Island, better known as potter’s field. Already the project has identified about 50 of the 54 bodies that have been disinterred.

John Minchillo photo

An anatomical specimen is displayed at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner where anthropologists routinely work to reveal the persons behind unclaimed and unidentified remains, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Bradley Adams, Ph.D., Director of Forensic Anthropology at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner speaks during an interview beside anatomical specimens, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

A scientist for the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner handles a human bone fragment in preparation for DNA testing, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

A scientist for the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner prepares samples for DNA testing, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Bradley Adams, Ph.D., Director of Forensic Anthropology at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner handles anatomical specimens in a laboratory, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Bradley Adams, Ph.D., Director of Forensic Anthropology at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner handles anatomical specimens in a laboratory, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Bradley Adams, Ph.D., Director of Forensic Anthropology at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner speaks during an interview beside anatomical specimens, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Anatomical specimens are displayed at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner where anthropologists routinely work to reveal the persons behind unclaimed and unidentified remains, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Anatomical specimens are displayed at the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner where anthropologists routinely work to reveal the persons behind unclaimed and unidentified remains, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.

John Minchillo photo

Scientists for the City of New York Office of Chief Medical Examiner prepare samples for DNA testing, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012, in New York. The office is undertaking an ambitious effort to identify the nameless dead in the city�s potter�s field, seeking to capitalize on the expertise that it gained over the last decade identifying remains from the World Trade Center attack.