Arrow-right Camera

Business

Holiday distractions spill over into office

Wed., Dec. 5, 2012, midnight

The holidays can be a grueling time for office workers, who must survive the ennui-filled purgatory between Thanksgiving and Christmas, recover from the boozy and body-wrecking holiday party circuit and fight off germs from the 80 percent of colleagues who come in to work despite being sick.

Out of that group who hit the cubicle while still battling sniffles and coughs, more than a quarter say they do it to avoid using a sick day. And among the workers who stay home to get over the worst of their symptoms, more than two-thirds return to the office while they’re still contagious, according to a recent survey from office supply chain Staples.

Each year, the flu results in 70 million missed workdays and $10 billion in lost office productivity. Blame the weakened immune systems on filthy office behavior. Half of employees don’t clean their work spaces once a week or more, according to the Staples report.

Then there’s the matter of holiday parties. Nearly two-thirds of Americans have either called in sick or know someone who has ditched work to tend to a hangover after a seasonal fete, according to a report by Caron Treatment Centers.

Such celebrations can erode productivity, according to the nonprofit addiction treatment establishment. In the aftermath of a holiday party, many employees arrive late and leave early from work, are distracted in the office, take longer lunch breaks or are sick at their desks.

“There is already a significant amount of stress and competition in the workplace,” Harris Stratyner, Caron’s vice president, said. “If employees are unable to perform because of drinking too much the night before, their job performance may be seriously impacted.”


 

Click here to comment on this story »